Reduction of joint pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis who have received monthly telephone calls from lay personnel and whose medical treatment regimens have remained stable

Jonathan René, Morris Weinberger, Steven A. Mazzuca, Kenneth D. Brandt, Barry Katz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

104 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. We previously reported that monthly telephone contact by lay personnel, to promote self-care for patients with osteoarthritis (OA), was associated with improved joint pain and physical function after 1 year of followup. The present study was a secondary analysis to determine whether improvement was contingent on intensified medical treatment. Methods. We reanalyzed control/treatment group differences in all 40 subjects with radiographically confirmed knee OA who had had no changes in antirheumatic drug therapy or institution of physical therapy during the period of observation. Results. Group differences in measured pain remained significant (effect size [ES] = 0.65 SD, P < 0.01). The same trend was observed for physical function (ES = 0.53 SD, P not significant). Conclusion. The findings in this reanalysis suggest that periodic telephone support interventions are effective enough to be regarded as an adjunctive treatment for OA.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)511-515
Number of pages5
JournalArthritis and Rheumatism
Volume35
Issue number5
StatePublished - May 1992

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Knee Osteoarthritis
Arthralgia
Telephone
Osteoarthritis
Antirheumatic Agents
Therapeutics
Self Care
Observation
Drug Therapy
Pain
Control Groups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Rheumatology

Cite this

Reduction of joint pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis who have received monthly telephone calls from lay personnel and whose medical treatment regimens have remained stable. / René, Jonathan; Weinberger, Morris; Mazzuca, Steven A.; Brandt, Kenneth D.; Katz, Barry.

In: Arthritis and Rheumatism, Vol. 35, No. 5, 05.1992, p. 511-515.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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