Regulation of human natural killer cell migration and proliferation by the exodus subfamily of CC chemokines

Michael Robertson, Brian T. Williams, Kent Christopherson, Zacharie Brahmi, Robert Hromas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Natural killer (NK) cells play an important role in innate and adaptive immune responses to obligate intracellular pathogens. Nevertheless, the regulation of NK cell trafficking and migration to inflammatory sites is poorly understood. Exodus-1/MIP-3α/LARC, Exodus-2/6Ckine/SLC, and Exodus- 3/MIP-3β/ELC/CKβ-11 are CC chemokines that share a unique aspartate- cysteine-cysteine-leucine motif near their amino terminus and preferentially stimulate the migration of T lymphocytes. The effects of Exodus chemokines on human NK cells were examined, Exodus-1, -2, and -3 did not induce detectable chemotaxis of resting peripheral blood NK cells. In contrast, Exodus-2 and -3 stimulated migration of polyclonal activated peripheral blood NK cells in a dose-dependent fashion. Exodus-2 and -3 also induced dose-dependent chemotaxis of NKL, an IL-2-dependent human NK cell line. Results of modified checkerboard assays indicate that migration of NKL cells in response to Exodus-2 and -3 represents true chemotaxis and not simply chemokinesis. Exodus-1, -2, and -3 did not induce NK cell proliferation in the absence of other stimuli. Nevertheless, Exodus-2 and -3 significantly augmented IL-2- induced proliferation of normal human CD56(dim) NK cells. In contrast, Exodus-1, -2, and -3 did not affect the cytolytic activity of resting or activated peripheral blood NK cells. Expression of message for CCR7, a shared receptor for Exodus-2 and -3, was detected in activated polyclonal NK cells and NKL cells but not resting NK cells. Taken together, these results indicate that Exodus-2 and -3 can participate in the recruitment and proliferation of activated NK cells. Exodus-2 and -3 may regulate interactions between T cells and NK cells that are crucial for the generation of optimal immune responses. (C) 2000 Academic Press.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)8-14
Number of pages7
JournalCellular Immunology
Volume199
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 10 2000

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CC Chemokines
Natural Killer Cells
Cell Movement
Cell Proliferation
Chemotaxis
Blood Cells
Interleukin-2
Cysteine
Chemokine CCL21
T-Lymphocytes
Adaptive Immunity
Chemokines
Innate Immunity
Aspartic Acid
Leucine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Immunology

Cite this

Regulation of human natural killer cell migration and proliferation by the exodus subfamily of CC chemokines. / Robertson, Michael; Williams, Brian T.; Christopherson, Kent; Brahmi, Zacharie; Hromas, Robert.

In: Cellular Immunology, Vol. 199, No. 1, 10.01.2000, p. 8-14.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Robertson, Michael ; Williams, Brian T. ; Christopherson, Kent ; Brahmi, Zacharie ; Hromas, Robert. / Regulation of human natural killer cell migration and proliferation by the exodus subfamily of CC chemokines. In: Cellular Immunology. 2000 ; Vol. 199, No. 1. pp. 8-14.
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