Relationship between the effect of carbon dioxide inhalation or nilvadipine on orbital blood flow in normal-tension glaucoma

Y. Niwa, T. Yamamoto, Alon Harris, L. Kagemann, H. Kawakami, Y. Kitazawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Purpose: To investigate the relationship between the effect of carbon dioxide (CO2) inhalation or oral nilvadipine, a calcium-channel blocker, on orbital blood flow in patients with normal-tension glaucoma, as determined by color Doppler imaging. Patients and Methods: Sixteen patients with normal-tension glaucoma (mean age, 55.6 ± 9.8 years; male:female ratio, 3:13) underwent color Doppler imaging to measure the resistance index, and peak systolic and end-diastolic blood flow velocities of the ophthalmic artery, central retinal artery, and nasal and temporal short posterior ciliary arteries. Measurements were taken before and during CO2 supplementation sufficient to increase the end-tidal CO2 partial pressure by 10%. The color Doppler imaging measurements were repeated after 2 to 4 weeks of treatment with 2 mg oral nilvadipine, and comparisons were made between the effects of the two treatments. Results: Both CO2 inhalation and nilvadipine treatment significantly reduced the resistance index in the central retinal artery, nasal short posterior ciliary artery, and temporal short posterior ciliary artery. There was a significant correlation between the effects of the two treatments on the difference in the resistance indexes of the ophthalmic artery and central retinal artery, but not on those of the nasal or temporal short posterior ciliary artery. Conclusions: Both CO2 inhalation and oral nilvadipine significantly reduce the resistance index measured by color Doppler imaging in orbital vessels. The effect of oral nilvadipine might be predicted by CO2 inhalation in patients with normal-tension glaucoma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)262-267
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Glaucoma
Volume9
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

nilvadipine
Low Tension Glaucoma
Ciliary Arteries
Carbon Dioxide
Inhalation
Retinal Artery
Color
Nose
Ophthalmic Artery
Blood Flow Velocity
Partial Pressure
Calcium Channel Blockers
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Calcium-channel blocker
  • Carbon dioxide
  • Color Doppler imaging
  • Normal-tension glaucoma
  • Orbital blood flow.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Relationship between the effect of carbon dioxide inhalation or nilvadipine on orbital blood flow in normal-tension glaucoma. / Niwa, Y.; Yamamoto, T.; Harris, Alon; Kagemann, L.; Kawakami, H.; Kitazawa, Y.

In: Journal of Glaucoma, Vol. 9, No. 3, 2000, p. 262-267.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Niwa, Y. ; Yamamoto, T. ; Harris, Alon ; Kagemann, L. ; Kawakami, H. ; Kitazawa, Y. / Relationship between the effect of carbon dioxide inhalation or nilvadipine on orbital blood flow in normal-tension glaucoma. In: Journal of Glaucoma. 2000 ; Vol. 9, No. 3. pp. 262-267.
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AU - Kawakami, H.

AU - Kitazawa, Y.

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N2 - Purpose: To investigate the relationship between the effect of carbon dioxide (CO2) inhalation or oral nilvadipine, a calcium-channel blocker, on orbital blood flow in patients with normal-tension glaucoma, as determined by color Doppler imaging. Patients and Methods: Sixteen patients with normal-tension glaucoma (mean age, 55.6 ± 9.8 years; male:female ratio, 3:13) underwent color Doppler imaging to measure the resistance index, and peak systolic and end-diastolic blood flow velocities of the ophthalmic artery, central retinal artery, and nasal and temporal short posterior ciliary arteries. Measurements were taken before and during CO2 supplementation sufficient to increase the end-tidal CO2 partial pressure by 10%. The color Doppler imaging measurements were repeated after 2 to 4 weeks of treatment with 2 mg oral nilvadipine, and comparisons were made between the effects of the two treatments. Results: Both CO2 inhalation and nilvadipine treatment significantly reduced the resistance index in the central retinal artery, nasal short posterior ciliary artery, and temporal short posterior ciliary artery. There was a significant correlation between the effects of the two treatments on the difference in the resistance indexes of the ophthalmic artery and central retinal artery, but not on those of the nasal or temporal short posterior ciliary artery. Conclusions: Both CO2 inhalation and oral nilvadipine significantly reduce the resistance index measured by color Doppler imaging in orbital vessels. The effect of oral nilvadipine might be predicted by CO2 inhalation in patients with normal-tension glaucoma.

AB - Purpose: To investigate the relationship between the effect of carbon dioxide (CO2) inhalation or oral nilvadipine, a calcium-channel blocker, on orbital blood flow in patients with normal-tension glaucoma, as determined by color Doppler imaging. Patients and Methods: Sixteen patients with normal-tension glaucoma (mean age, 55.6 ± 9.8 years; male:female ratio, 3:13) underwent color Doppler imaging to measure the resistance index, and peak systolic and end-diastolic blood flow velocities of the ophthalmic artery, central retinal artery, and nasal and temporal short posterior ciliary arteries. Measurements were taken before and during CO2 supplementation sufficient to increase the end-tidal CO2 partial pressure by 10%. The color Doppler imaging measurements were repeated after 2 to 4 weeks of treatment with 2 mg oral nilvadipine, and comparisons were made between the effects of the two treatments. Results: Both CO2 inhalation and nilvadipine treatment significantly reduced the resistance index in the central retinal artery, nasal short posterior ciliary artery, and temporal short posterior ciliary artery. There was a significant correlation between the effects of the two treatments on the difference in the resistance indexes of the ophthalmic artery and central retinal artery, but not on those of the nasal or temporal short posterior ciliary artery. Conclusions: Both CO2 inhalation and oral nilvadipine significantly reduce the resistance index measured by color Doppler imaging in orbital vessels. The effect of oral nilvadipine might be predicted by CO2 inhalation in patients with normal-tension glaucoma.

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KW - Carbon dioxide

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