Relationship between weight loss maintenance and changes in serum leptin levels

R. R. Wing, M. K. Sinha, Robert Considine, W. Lang, J. F. Caro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

97 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Serum leptin concentrations are higher in obese humans than in lean and are decreased by initial weight loss. This study examined the effects of maintenance of weight loss on leptin concentrations and tested whether leptin concentrations at baseline or after initial weight loss are related to the ability to maintain a reduced body weight. Fifty-two overweight women [body mass index (kg/m2) averaging 31.3] were studied before and after a 4 month weight loss program and at 6 month follow-up. Subjects lost 8.1 kg over the 4 month program, and leptin concentrations decreased from 30.1 to 20.4 ng/ml. Initial leptin level per unit body mass index (r = - 0.61, p ≤ 0.0001) and weight loss during months 0 to 4 (r = 0.39, p = 0.004) were both significantly associated with initial changes in leptin, and together explained 60% of the variance in change in leptin. Subjects who maintained their weight losses over the 6-month follow-up maintained their reductions in leptin levels; again, weight changes during follow-up were correlated with changes in serum leptin levels (r = 0.41, p = 0.003). There was no evidence that baseline leptin concentration (or leptin/body mass index) or the changes in leptin which accompanied initial weight loss were predictive of subsequent weight regain. Thus, changes in leptin concentration during weight loss track with changes in weight. However, neither baseline concentrations nor initial changes in leptin predict success at weight loss or maintenance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)698-703
Number of pages6
JournalHormone and Metabolic Research
Volume28
Issue number12
StatePublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Leptin
Weight Loss
Maintenance
Serum
Body Mass Index
Weights and Measures
Weight Reduction Programs
Regain
Body Weight

Keywords

  • leptin
  • obesity
  • weight loss

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Relationship between weight loss maintenance and changes in serum leptin levels. / Wing, R. R.; Sinha, M. K.; Considine, Robert; Lang, W.; Caro, J. F.

In: Hormone and Metabolic Research, Vol. 28, No. 12, 1996, p. 698-703.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wing, R. R. ; Sinha, M. K. ; Considine, Robert ; Lang, W. ; Caro, J. F. / Relationship between weight loss maintenance and changes in serum leptin levels. In: Hormone and Metabolic Research. 1996 ; Vol. 28, No. 12. pp. 698-703.
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