Relationships of stigma and shame to gonorrhea and HIV screening

J. Dennis Fortenberry, Mary McFarlane, Amy Bleakley, Sheana Bull, Martin Fishbein, Diane M. Grimley, C. Kevin Malotte, Bradley P. Stoner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

286 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationships between stigma and shame associated with seeking treatment for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and undergoing testing for gonorrhea and HIV. Methods. Participants were 847 males and 1126 females (mean age: 24.9 years) in 7 cities. Two scales assessed STD-related stigma and STD-related shame. Results. Rates of stigma and shame were higher among participants without a gonorrhea test in the past year and among those without an HIV test. Sex, age, health service use, previous suspicion of gonorrhea, and low levels of stigma were independently associated with gonorrhea testing. Age, enrollment site, use of health services, gonorrhea testing, and low levels of stigma were independently associated with HIV testing. Conclusions. Shame is part of the experience of seeking STD-related care, but stigma may be a more powerful barrier to obtaining such care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)378-381
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume92
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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    Fortenberry, J. D., McFarlane, M., Bleakley, A., Bull, S., Fishbein, M., Grimley, D. M., Malotte, C. K., & Stoner, B. P. (2002). Relationships of stigma and shame to gonorrhea and HIV screening. American journal of public health, 92(3), 378-381. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.92.3.378