Relative importance of renal failure and increased bone resorption in the hypercalcaemia of myelomatosis

P. J. Heyburn, J. A. Child, Munro Peacock

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Abstract

In order to define the relative importance of renal failure and increased bone resorption in the hypercalcaemia of myelomatosis 22 untreated patients were studied, of whom 12 were hypercalcaemia. Most patients had malabsorption of radiocalcium from the gastrointestinal tract and evidence of increased bone resorption of radiocalcium from the gastrointestinal tract and evidence of increased bone resorption as assessed by fasting urinary hydroxyproline/creatinine ratio. The mean OHPr/Cr ratio, however, was similar in patients with and without hypercalcaemia. Renal failure and Bence Jones proteinuria occurred more frequently in the hypercalcaemic patients. In four patients with hypercalcaemia there was an increase in OHPr/Cr after saline infusion accompanied by an improvement in renal function and hypercalcaemia. Mithramycin given to the same patients further reduced hypercalcaemia, presumably by inhibiting bone resorption. It was concluded that the hypercalcaemia of myelomatosis is due to the combination of renal failure and increased bone resorption, but that the OHPr/Cr ratio in the untreated state is a poor indicator of the degree of bone resorption in hypercalcaemic patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)54-57
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Clinical Pathology
Volume34
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1981
Externally publishedYes

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Hypercalcemia
Bone Resorption
Multiple Myeloma
Renal Insufficiency
Gastrointestinal Tract
Plicamycin
Hydroxyproline
Proteinuria
Fasting
Creatinine
Kidney

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Relative importance of renal failure and increased bone resorption in the hypercalcaemia of myelomatosis. / Heyburn, P. J.; Child, J. A.; Peacock, Munro.

In: Journal of Clinical Pathology, Vol. 34, No. 1, 1981, p. 54-57.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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N2 - In order to define the relative importance of renal failure and increased bone resorption in the hypercalcaemia of myelomatosis 22 untreated patients were studied, of whom 12 were hypercalcaemia. Most patients had malabsorption of radiocalcium from the gastrointestinal tract and evidence of increased bone resorption of radiocalcium from the gastrointestinal tract and evidence of increased bone resorption as assessed by fasting urinary hydroxyproline/creatinine ratio. The mean OHPr/Cr ratio, however, was similar in patients with and without hypercalcaemia. Renal failure and Bence Jones proteinuria occurred more frequently in the hypercalcaemic patients. In four patients with hypercalcaemia there was an increase in OHPr/Cr after saline infusion accompanied by an improvement in renal function and hypercalcaemia. Mithramycin given to the same patients further reduced hypercalcaemia, presumably by inhibiting bone resorption. It was concluded that the hypercalcaemia of myelomatosis is due to the combination of renal failure and increased bone resorption, but that the OHPr/Cr ratio in the untreated state is a poor indicator of the degree of bone resorption in hypercalcaemic patients.

AB - In order to define the relative importance of renal failure and increased bone resorption in the hypercalcaemia of myelomatosis 22 untreated patients were studied, of whom 12 were hypercalcaemia. Most patients had malabsorption of radiocalcium from the gastrointestinal tract and evidence of increased bone resorption of radiocalcium from the gastrointestinal tract and evidence of increased bone resorption as assessed by fasting urinary hydroxyproline/creatinine ratio. The mean OHPr/Cr ratio, however, was similar in patients with and without hypercalcaemia. Renal failure and Bence Jones proteinuria occurred more frequently in the hypercalcaemic patients. In four patients with hypercalcaemia there was an increase in OHPr/Cr after saline infusion accompanied by an improvement in renal function and hypercalcaemia. Mithramycin given to the same patients further reduced hypercalcaemia, presumably by inhibiting bone resorption. It was concluded that the hypercalcaemia of myelomatosis is due to the combination of renal failure and increased bone resorption, but that the OHPr/Cr ratio in the untreated state is a poor indicator of the degree of bone resorption in hypercalcaemic patients.

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