Relative sensitivity of magnetic resonance spectroscopy and quantitative magnetic resonance imaging to cognitive function among nondemented individuals infected with HIV

Robert H. Paul, Thomas Ernst, Adam M. Brickman, Constantin Yiannoutsos, David F. Tate, Ronald A. Cohen, Bradford A. Navia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the present study, we examined the relationships among cognitive function, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) brain metabolite indices measured in the basal ganglia, and quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the caudate nucleus and the putamen in the earliest stages of HIV-related cognitive involvement. Participants included 22 HIV-positive individuals and 20 HIV-negative individuals. HIV-positive individuals performed significantly more poorly than the HIV-negative individuals on several cognitive measures. In addition, the choline/ creatine ratio was significantly higher and the N-acetyl aspartate/ choline ratio was significantly lower among HIV patients. The caudate and putamen sizes were smaller among HIV-positive patients compared with controls; however, the differences did not reach statistical significance. Correlation analyses revealed associations between cognitive function and select MRS indices. In addition, caudate size was significantly correlated with performances on higher-order thinking tests whereas putamen size was significantly correlated with performances on motor tests. The results suggest that MRS differences are more pronounced than area size differences between seropositive and seronegative individuals in mild stages of HIV-related cognitive impairment. However, basal ganglia size remains an important contributor to cognitive status in this population. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine the evolution of these imaging correlates of HIV-cognitive impairment in HIV.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)725-733
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the International Neuropsychological Society
Volume14
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008

Fingerprint

Cognition
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
HIV
Putamen
Choline
Basal Ganglia
Creatine
Caudate Nucleus
Longitudinal Studies
Brain

Keywords

  • Brain
  • Circuit
  • Infection
  • MRS
  • Neuroimaging
  • Subcortical

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Relative sensitivity of magnetic resonance spectroscopy and quantitative magnetic resonance imaging to cognitive function among nondemented individuals infected with HIV. / Paul, Robert H.; Ernst, Thomas; Brickman, Adam M.; Yiannoutsos, Constantin; Tate, David F.; Cohen, Ronald A.; Navia, Bradford A.

In: Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, Vol. 14, No. 5, 2008, p. 725-733.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{95a8e8b84929489988c704a56dfa4719,
title = "Relative sensitivity of magnetic resonance spectroscopy and quantitative magnetic resonance imaging to cognitive function among nondemented individuals infected with HIV",
abstract = "In the present study, we examined the relationships among cognitive function, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) brain metabolite indices measured in the basal ganglia, and quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the caudate nucleus and the putamen in the earliest stages of HIV-related cognitive involvement. Participants included 22 HIV-positive individuals and 20 HIV-negative individuals. HIV-positive individuals performed significantly more poorly than the HIV-negative individuals on several cognitive measures. In addition, the choline/ creatine ratio was significantly higher and the N-acetyl aspartate/ choline ratio was significantly lower among HIV patients. The caudate and putamen sizes were smaller among HIV-positive patients compared with controls; however, the differences did not reach statistical significance. Correlation analyses revealed associations between cognitive function and select MRS indices. In addition, caudate size was significantly correlated with performances on higher-order thinking tests whereas putamen size was significantly correlated with performances on motor tests. The results suggest that MRS differences are more pronounced than area size differences between seropositive and seronegative individuals in mild stages of HIV-related cognitive impairment. However, basal ganglia size remains an important contributor to cognitive status in this population. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine the evolution of these imaging correlates of HIV-cognitive impairment in HIV.",
keywords = "Brain, Circuit, Infection, MRS, Neuroimaging, Subcortical",
author = "Paul, {Robert H.} and Thomas Ernst and Brickman, {Adam M.} and Constantin Yiannoutsos and Tate, {David F.} and Cohen, {Ronald A.} and Navia, {Bradford A.}",
year = "2008",
doi = "10.1017/S1355617708080910",
language = "English",
volume = "14",
pages = "725--733",
journal = "Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society",
issn = "1355-6177",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Relative sensitivity of magnetic resonance spectroscopy and quantitative magnetic resonance imaging to cognitive function among nondemented individuals infected with HIV

AU - Paul, Robert H.

AU - Ernst, Thomas

AU - Brickman, Adam M.

AU - Yiannoutsos, Constantin

AU - Tate, David F.

AU - Cohen, Ronald A.

AU - Navia, Bradford A.

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - In the present study, we examined the relationships among cognitive function, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) brain metabolite indices measured in the basal ganglia, and quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the caudate nucleus and the putamen in the earliest stages of HIV-related cognitive involvement. Participants included 22 HIV-positive individuals and 20 HIV-negative individuals. HIV-positive individuals performed significantly more poorly than the HIV-negative individuals on several cognitive measures. In addition, the choline/ creatine ratio was significantly higher and the N-acetyl aspartate/ choline ratio was significantly lower among HIV patients. The caudate and putamen sizes were smaller among HIV-positive patients compared with controls; however, the differences did not reach statistical significance. Correlation analyses revealed associations between cognitive function and select MRS indices. In addition, caudate size was significantly correlated with performances on higher-order thinking tests whereas putamen size was significantly correlated with performances on motor tests. The results suggest that MRS differences are more pronounced than area size differences between seropositive and seronegative individuals in mild stages of HIV-related cognitive impairment. However, basal ganglia size remains an important contributor to cognitive status in this population. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine the evolution of these imaging correlates of HIV-cognitive impairment in HIV.

AB - In the present study, we examined the relationships among cognitive function, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) brain metabolite indices measured in the basal ganglia, and quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the caudate nucleus and the putamen in the earliest stages of HIV-related cognitive involvement. Participants included 22 HIV-positive individuals and 20 HIV-negative individuals. HIV-positive individuals performed significantly more poorly than the HIV-negative individuals on several cognitive measures. In addition, the choline/ creatine ratio was significantly higher and the N-acetyl aspartate/ choline ratio was significantly lower among HIV patients. The caudate and putamen sizes were smaller among HIV-positive patients compared with controls; however, the differences did not reach statistical significance. Correlation analyses revealed associations between cognitive function and select MRS indices. In addition, caudate size was significantly correlated with performances on higher-order thinking tests whereas putamen size was significantly correlated with performances on motor tests. The results suggest that MRS differences are more pronounced than area size differences between seropositive and seronegative individuals in mild stages of HIV-related cognitive impairment. However, basal ganglia size remains an important contributor to cognitive status in this population. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine the evolution of these imaging correlates of HIV-cognitive impairment in HIV.

KW - Brain

KW - Circuit

KW - Infection

KW - MRS

KW - Neuroimaging

KW - Subcortical

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=51349138915&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=51349138915&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/S1355617708080910

DO - 10.1017/S1355617708080910

M3 - Article

C2 - 18764968

AN - SCOPUS:51349138915

VL - 14

SP - 725

EP - 733

JO - Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society

JF - Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society

SN - 1355-6177

IS - 5

ER -