Reliability and validity of a steadiness score

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To determine the internal consistency and construct and predictive validity of three survey questions regarding steadiness in a sample of community-dwelling lower-income older adults. DESIGN: A 6-month prospective cohort study. SETTING: Community-based. PARTICIPANTS: Three hundred fifty-seven older adults who completed a baseline and 6-month follow-up interviewer- administered survey. These older adults received care at a single, public health system and were judged by insurance status to be of low income. MEASUREMENTS: Self-report measures of steadiness while walking and transferring; difficulty in mobility, activities of daily living (ADLs), and instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs); chronic illness; falls; hospitalization; and sociodemographic characteristics. RESULTS: The three steadiness questions showed good internal consistency (0.88); construct validity in Pearson correlations with mobility (0.57), ADL (0.53), and IADL scores (0.41); and predictive validity. With regard to predictive validity, steadiness was predictive of falls, hospitalization, and decline in ADL and IADL function over a subsequent 6-month period. CONCLUSION: Steadiness questions are a potentially valuable addition to survey research and clinical screening to identify persons with current impairment status and falls and disability risk.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1582-1586
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
Volume53
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2005

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Activities of Daily Living
Reproducibility of Results
Hospitalization
Independent Living
Insurance Coverage
Self Report
Walking
Chronic Disease
Cohort Studies
Public Health
Prospective Studies
Interviews
Research
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Balance
  • Disability process
  • Falls
  • Mobility
  • Steadiness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Reliability and validity of a steadiness score. / Clark, Daniel; Callahan, Christopher; Counsell, Steven.

In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, Vol. 53, No. 9, 09.2005, p. 1582-1586.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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