Reliability and validity of the compliance belief scales among patients with heart failure

Susan Pressler, Susan Perkins, Kathleen A. Lane, Melissa A. Forthofer, D. Craig Brater, Michael Murray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Lack of medication and dietary compliance leads to troublesome symptoms and hospitalization in patients with heart failure. Compliance behaviors are influenced by beliefs about the behavior. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of the Beliefs about Medication Compliance Scale (BMCS) and the Beliefs about Dietary Compliance Scale (BDCS) among patients with heart failure. THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK: This study's theoretical framework is the Health Belief Model. METHODS: A convenience sample of 234 patients with heart failure completed the BMCS and the BDCS. Patients completed the scales at baseline by face-to-face interviews and at 8 and 52 weeks after baseline by telephone interview. RESULTS: Construct validity of the scales was supported by confirmatory factor analysis. Both the BMCS and the BDCS had benefits and barriers scales with clear factor loadings. The internal consistency reliability estimates of the scales ranged from .63 to .88, with the BMCS having some estimates lower than .70. The test-retest reliability estimates ranged from .07 to .57. The intraclass correlation coefficient estimates were higher between the 8-week and 52-week scores for all scales. Possible reasons for the varying estimates are discussed. The BMCS and the BDCS have documented reliability and validity. Future work CONCLUSIONS: should be directed at evaluating the responsiveness of the scales to changing patient conditions and testing interventions to improve medication and dietary compliance through changing beliefs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)177-185
Number of pages9
JournalHeart and Lung: Journal of Acute and Critical Care
Volume30
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

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Reproducibility of Results
Compliance
Heart Failure
Medication Adherence
Interviews
Statistical Factor Analysis
Hospitalization
Theoretical Models

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Reliability and validity of the compliance belief scales among patients with heart failure. / Pressler, Susan; Perkins, Susan; Lane, Kathleen A.; Forthofer, Melissa A.; Brater, D. Craig; Murray, Michael.

In: Heart and Lung: Journal of Acute and Critical Care, Vol. 30, No. 3, 2001, p. 177-185.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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