Religion and Spirituality in Surrogate Decision Making for Hospitalized Older Adults

Kristin N. Geros-Willfond, Steven S. Ivy, Kianna Montz, Sara E. Bohan, Alexia Torke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We conducted semi-structured interviews with 46 surrogate decision makers for hospitalized older adults to characterize the role of spirituality and religion in decision making. Three themes emerged: (1) religion as a guide to decision making, (2) control, and (3) faith, death and dying. For religious surrogates, religion played a central role in end of life decisions. There was variability regarding whether God or humans were perceived to be in control; however, beliefs about control led to varying perspectives on acceptance of comfort-focused treatment. We conclude that clinicians should attend to religious considerations due to their impact on decision making.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Religion and Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Sep 4 2015

Fingerprint

Spirituality
Religion
Decision Making
Interviews

Keywords

  • Proxy
  • Religion
  • Spirituality
  • Surrogate decision making

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Religious studies
  • Medicine(all)
  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Religion and Spirituality in Surrogate Decision Making for Hospitalized Older Adults. / Geros-Willfond, Kristin N.; Ivy, Steven S.; Montz, Kianna; Bohan, Sara E.; Torke, Alexia.

In: Journal of Religion and Health, 04.09.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Geros-Willfond, Kristin N. ; Ivy, Steven S. ; Montz, Kianna ; Bohan, Sara E. ; Torke, Alexia. / Religion and Spirituality in Surrogate Decision Making for Hospitalized Older Adults. In: Journal of Religion and Health. 2015.
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