Religion, Kinship and Health Behaviors of African American Women

Kathryn Coe, Colleen Keller, Jenelle R. Walker

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    4 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    A positive relationship exists between functional health and religion. We present an empirical definition of religion and describe the key elements of religious behavior, building a model that can be used to explore the presumed relationship between religion and health. Semi-structured interactive interviews were conducted with 22 participants over a 6-month period. Head Start programs and churches located in the inner city of a large metropolitan area. Twenty-two African American women were aged from 21 to 45. We focus on social relationships and propose that prophet-created religions mimic kinship relationships and encourage kinship-like cooperation between members.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)46-60
    Number of pages15
    JournalJournal of Religion and Health
    Volume54
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 2013

    Fingerprint

    Health Behavior
    Religion
    African Americans
    Health
    Interviews
    Kinship
    African American Women

    Keywords

    • Obesity/overweight
    • Relationships/research
    • Religion/spirituality

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Religious studies
    • Medicine(all)
    • Nursing(all)

    Cite this

    Religion, Kinship and Health Behaviors of African American Women. / Coe, Kathryn; Keller, Colleen; Walker, Jenelle R.

    In: Journal of Religion and Health, Vol. 54, No. 1, 2013, p. 46-60.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Coe, Kathryn ; Keller, Colleen ; Walker, Jenelle R. / Religion, Kinship and Health Behaviors of African American Women. In: Journal of Religion and Health. 2013 ; Vol. 54, No. 1. pp. 46-60.
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