Religiosity and adolescent narcissism: Implications for values counseling

Matthew Aalsma, Daniel K. Lapsley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors show that the distinctive character of values counseling as a therapeutic intervention can be justified on empirical grounds. The fact that religiosity has been consistently associated with positive mental health outcomes is a warrant for counselors to explore the resources of one’s religious tradition for therapeutic change. The authors also argue that pastoral counseling is particularly suited for addressing the ego development needs of adolescents and that the vicissitudes of adolescent narcissism can be effectively mobilized to support self-transcendence and relational autonomy, tasks that have both developmental and religious significance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)17-29
Number of pages13
JournalCounseling and Values
Volume44
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Narcissism
Counseling
Adolescent Development
Ego
Mental Health
Therapeutics
Religiosity
Counselors
Resources
Pastoral Counseling
Transcendence
Religious Traditions
Religion
Autonomy
Vicissitudes
Warrants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Religious studies

Cite this

Religiosity and adolescent narcissism : Implications for values counseling. / Aalsma, Matthew; Lapsley, Daniel K.

In: Counseling and Values, Vol. 44, No. 1, 01.01.1999, p. 17-29.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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