Repetitive Head Impact Exposure in College Football Following an NCAA Rule Change to Eliminate Two-A-Day Preseason Practices: A Study from the NCAA-DoD CARE Consortium

And the CARE Consortium Investigators

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Repetitive head impact exposure sustained by athletes of contact sports has been hypothesized to be a mechanism for concussion and a possible explanation for the high degree of variability in sport-related concussion biomechanics. In an attempt to limit repetitive head impact exposure during the football preseason, the NCAA eliminated two-a-day practices in 2017, while maintaining the total number of team practice sessions. The objective of this study was to quantify head impact exposure during the preseason and regular season in Division I college football athletes to determine whether the 2017 NCAA ruling decreased head impact exposure. 342 unique athletes from five NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) programs were consented and enrolled. Head impacts were recorded using the Head Impact Telemetry (HIT) System during the entire fall preseasons and regular seasons in 2016 and 2017. Despite the elimination of two-a-day practices, the number of preseason contact days increased in 2017, with an increase in average hourly impact exposure (i.e., contact intensity), resulting in a significant increase in total head impact burden (+ 26%) for the 2017 preseason. This finding would indicate that the 2017 NCAA ruling was not effective at reducing the head impact burden during the football preseason. Additionally, athletes sustained a significantly higher number of recorded head impacts per week (+ 40%) during the preseason than the regular season, implicating the preseason as a time of elevated repetitive head impact burden. With increased recognition of a possible association between repetitive head impact exposure and concussion, increased preseason exposure may predispose certain athletes to a higher risk of concussion during the preseason and regular season. Accordingly, efforts at reducing concussion incidence in contact sports should include a reduction in overall head impact exposure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2073-2085
Number of pages13
JournalAnnals of Biomedical Engineering
Volume47
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2019

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Sports
Biomechanics
Telemetering
Association reactions

Keywords

  • Acceleration
  • Injury biomechanics
  • Sport-related concussion
  • Traumatic brain injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Repetitive Head Impact Exposure in College Football Following an NCAA Rule Change to Eliminate Two-A-Day Preseason Practices : A Study from the NCAA-DoD CARE Consortium. / And the CARE Consortium Investigators.

In: Annals of Biomedical Engineering, Vol. 47, No. 10, 01.10.2019, p. 2073-2085.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Repetitive head impact exposure sustained by athletes of contact sports has been hypothesized to be a mechanism for concussion and a possible explanation for the high degree of variability in sport-related concussion biomechanics. In an attempt to limit repetitive head impact exposure during the football preseason, the NCAA eliminated two-a-day practices in 2017, while maintaining the total number of team practice sessions. The objective of this study was to quantify head impact exposure during the preseason and regular season in Division I college football athletes to determine whether the 2017 NCAA ruling decreased head impact exposure. 342 unique athletes from five NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) programs were consented and enrolled. Head impacts were recorded using the Head Impact Telemetry (HIT) System during the entire fall preseasons and regular seasons in 2016 and 2017. Despite the elimination of two-a-day practices, the number of preseason contact days increased in 2017, with an increase in average hourly impact exposure (i.e., contact intensity), resulting in a significant increase in total head impact burden (+ 26{\%}) for the 2017 preseason. This finding would indicate that the 2017 NCAA ruling was not effective at reducing the head impact burden during the football preseason. Additionally, athletes sustained a significantly higher number of recorded head impacts per week (+ 40{\%}) during the preseason than the regular season, implicating the preseason as a time of elevated repetitive head impact burden. With increased recognition of a possible association between repetitive head impact exposure and concussion, increased preseason exposure may predispose certain athletes to a higher risk of concussion during the preseason and regular season. Accordingly, efforts at reducing concussion incidence in contact sports should include a reduction in overall head impact exposure.",
keywords = "Acceleration, Injury biomechanics, Sport-related concussion, Traumatic brain injury",
author = "{And the CARE Consortium Investigators} and Stemper, {Brian D.} and Shah, {Alok S.} and Jaroslaw Harezlak and Steven Rowson and Stefan Duma and Mihalik, {Jason P.} and Riggen, {Larry D.} and Alison Brooks and Cameron, {Kenneth L.} and Giza, {Christopher C.} and Houston, {Megan N.} and Jonathan Jackson and Posner, {Matthew A.} and Gerald McGinty and John DiFiori and Broglio, {Steven P.} and McAllister, {Thomas W.} and Michael McCrea and Hoy, {April Marie} and Hazzard, {Joseph B.} and Kelly, {Louise A.} and Ortega, {Justus D.} and Nicholas Port and Margot Putukian and Langford, {T. Dianne} and Ryan Tierney and Goldman, {Joshua T.} and Benjamin, {Holly J.} and Thomas Buckley and Kaminski, {Thomas W.} and Clugston, {James R.} and Schmidt, {Julianne D.} and Feigenbaum, {Luis A.} and Eckner, {James T.} and Kevin Guskiewicz and Miles, {Jessica Dysart} and Scott Anderson and Master, {Christina L.} and Micky Collins and Kontos, {Anthony P.} and Bazarian, {Jeffrey J.} and Chrisman, {Sara P.O.} and Patrick O’Donnell and Kenneth Cameron and Adam Susmarski and Steve Rowson and Bullers, {Christopher Todd} and Miles, {Christopher M.} and Dykhuizen, {Brian H.} and Laura Lintner",
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KW - Injury biomechanics

KW - Sport-related concussion

KW - Traumatic brain injury

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