Repetitive pediatric anesthesia in a non-hospital setting

Jeffrey C. Buchsbaum, Kevin P. McMullen, James G. Douglas, Jeffrey L. Jackson, R. Victor Simoneaux, Matthew Hines, Jennifer Bratton, John Kerstiens, Peter A.S. Johnstone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Repetitive sedation/anesthesia (S/A) for children receiving fractionated radiation therapy requires induction and recovery daily for several weeks. In the vast majority of cases, this is accomplished in an academic center with direct access to pediatric faculty and facilities in case of an emergency. Proton radiation therapy centers are more frequently free-standing facilities at some distance from specialized pediatric care. This poses a potential dilemma in the case of children requiring anesthesia. Methods and Materials: The records of the Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center were reviewed for patients requiring anesthesia during proton beam therapy (PBT) between June 1, 2008, and April 12, 2012. Results: A total of 138 children received daily anesthesia during this period. A median of 30 fractions (range, 1-49) was delivered over a median of 43 days (range, 1-74) for a total of 4045 sedation/anesthesia procedures. Three events (0.0074%) occurred, 1 fall from a gurney during anesthesia recovery and 2 aspiration events requiring emergency department evaluation. All 3 children did well. One aspiration patient needed admission to the hospital and mechanical ventilation support. The other patient returned the next day for treatment without issue. The patient who fell was not injured. No patient required cessation of therapy. Conclusions: This is the largest reported series of repetitive pediatric anesthesia in radiation therapy, and the only available data from the proton environment. Strict adherence to rigorous protocols and a well-trained team can safely deliver daily sedation/anesthesia in free-standing proton centers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1296-1300
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics
Volume85
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2013

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anesthesia
Anesthesia
Pediatrics
Proton Therapy
radiation therapy
therapy
Radiotherapy
protons
emergencies
Protons
Stretchers
recovery
vacuum
Patient Admission
ventilation
proton beams
Artificial Respiration
health
Hospital Emergency Service
induction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiation
  • Oncology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Buchsbaum, J. C., McMullen, K. P., Douglas, J. G., Jackson, J. L., Simoneaux, R. V., Hines, M., ... Johnstone, P. A. S. (2013). Repetitive pediatric anesthesia in a non-hospital setting. International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics, 85(5), 1296-1300. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2012.10.006

Repetitive pediatric anesthesia in a non-hospital setting. / Buchsbaum, Jeffrey C.; McMullen, Kevin P.; Douglas, James G.; Jackson, Jeffrey L.; Simoneaux, R. Victor; Hines, Matthew; Bratton, Jennifer; Kerstiens, John; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

In: International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics, Vol. 85, No. 5, 01.04.2013, p. 1296-1300.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Buchsbaum, JC, McMullen, KP, Douglas, JG, Jackson, JL, Simoneaux, RV, Hines, M, Bratton, J, Kerstiens, J & Johnstone, PAS 2013, 'Repetitive pediatric anesthesia in a non-hospital setting', International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics, vol. 85, no. 5, pp. 1296-1300. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2012.10.006
Buchsbaum JC, McMullen KP, Douglas JG, Jackson JL, Simoneaux RV, Hines M et al. Repetitive pediatric anesthesia in a non-hospital setting. International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics. 2013 Apr 1;85(5):1296-1300. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2012.10.006
Buchsbaum, Jeffrey C. ; McMullen, Kevin P. ; Douglas, James G. ; Jackson, Jeffrey L. ; Simoneaux, R. Victor ; Hines, Matthew ; Bratton, Jennifer ; Kerstiens, John ; Johnstone, Peter A.S. / Repetitive pediatric anesthesia in a non-hospital setting. In: International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics. 2013 ; Vol. 85, No. 5. pp. 1296-1300.
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