Replication-Competent Lentivirus Analysis of Vector-Transduced T Cell Products Used in Cancer Immunotherapy Clinical Trials

Kenneth Cornetta, Sue Koop, Emily Nance, Kimberley House, Lisa Duffy

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Lentiviral vectors are being used in a growing number of clinical applications, including T cell immunotherapy for cancer. As this new technology moves forward, a safety concern is the inadvertent recombination and subsequent development of a replication-competent lentivirus (RCL) during the manufacture of the vector material. To assess this risk, regulators have required screening of T cell products infused into patients for RCL. Since vector particles have many of the proteins and nucleotide sequences found in RCL, a biologic assay has proven the most sensitive method for RCL detection. As regulators have required screening of up to 108 cells per T cell product, this method described a procedure for assessing RCL contamination of large-volume T cell products.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMethods in Molecular Biology
PublisherHumana Press Inc.
Pages181-194
Number of pages14
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2020

Publication series

NameMethods in Molecular Biology
Volume2086
ISSN (Print)1064-3745
ISSN (Electronic)1940-6029

Fingerprint

Lentivirus
Immunotherapy
Clinical Trials
T-Lymphocytes
Neoplasms
Biological Assay
Genetic Recombination
Technology
Safety
Proteins

Keywords

  • Lentiviral vectors, T cell immunotherapy, Replication-competent lentivirus, Clinical trials, CAR-T cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Cornetta, K., Koop, S., Nance, E., House, K., & Duffy, L. (2020). Replication-Competent Lentivirus Analysis of Vector-Transduced T Cell Products Used in Cancer Immunotherapy Clinical Trials. In Methods in Molecular Biology (pp. 181-194). (Methods in Molecular Biology; Vol. 2086). Humana Press Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-0716-0146-4_13

Replication-Competent Lentivirus Analysis of Vector-Transduced T Cell Products Used in Cancer Immunotherapy Clinical Trials. / Cornetta, Kenneth; Koop, Sue; Nance, Emily; House, Kimberley; Duffy, Lisa.

Methods in Molecular Biology. Humana Press Inc., 2020. p. 181-194 (Methods in Molecular Biology; Vol. 2086).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Cornetta, K, Koop, S, Nance, E, House, K & Duffy, L 2020, Replication-Competent Lentivirus Analysis of Vector-Transduced T Cell Products Used in Cancer Immunotherapy Clinical Trials. in Methods in Molecular Biology. Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 2086, Humana Press Inc., pp. 181-194. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-0716-0146-4_13
Cornetta K, Koop S, Nance E, House K, Duffy L. Replication-Competent Lentivirus Analysis of Vector-Transduced T Cell Products Used in Cancer Immunotherapy Clinical Trials. In Methods in Molecular Biology. Humana Press Inc. 2020. p. 181-194. (Methods in Molecular Biology). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-0716-0146-4_13
Cornetta, Kenneth ; Koop, Sue ; Nance, Emily ; House, Kimberley ; Duffy, Lisa. / Replication-Competent Lentivirus Analysis of Vector-Transduced T Cell Products Used in Cancer Immunotherapy Clinical Trials. Methods in Molecular Biology. Humana Press Inc., 2020. pp. 181-194 (Methods in Molecular Biology).
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