Research in Pediatric Residency: National Experience of Pediatric Chief Residents

Megan McHenry, Erika L. Abramson, Michael P. McKenna, Su Ting T. Li

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To determine factors associated with increased research productivity, satisfaction, and perceived barriers to research within residency from the experience of pediatric chief residents. Methods An online cross-sectional survey was administered to academic year 2014–15 chief residents. Topics assessed included program demographic characteristics, career intentions, research productivity, satisfaction with research training and opportunities, and research barriers. Chi-square and Fisher exact tests were used for descriptive statistics. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to determine factors associated with productivity and research satisfaction. Results The response rate was 63% (165 of 261). Half (82 of 165) were productive in research. Most were satisfied with their quality of research training (55%; 90 of 165) and research opportunities (69%; 114 of 165). Chiefs reporting interest in research were 5 times more likely to be productive than those who did not (odds ratio [OR] = 5.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.3–11.8). Productive chiefs were more likely to report including research time in future careers (P = .003). Most (83%; 137 of 165) thought their programs were supportive of resident research, but lack of time was frequently cited as a major barrier. Those satisfied with research opportunities were less likely to find lack of training (OR = 0.3; 95% CI, 0.1–0.7) or faculty mentorship (OR = 0.2; 95% CI, 0.0–0.9) as a major barrier. Conclusions Pediatric chief resident interest in research is strongly associated with research productivity during residency, and research productivity is strongly associated with career plans including research time. By cultivating research interest through faculty mentorship, research training, and dedicated time, pediatric residency programs might help foster early research success and, potentially lead to continued engagement with research in trainees' future careers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)144-148
Number of pages5
JournalAcademic Pediatrics
Volume17
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017

Fingerprint

Internship and Residency
Pediatrics
Research
Mentors
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals

Keywords

  • chief residents
  • medical education
  • pediatrics
  • research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Research in Pediatric Residency : National Experience of Pediatric Chief Residents. / McHenry, Megan; Abramson, Erika L.; McKenna, Michael P.; Li, Su Ting T.

In: Academic Pediatrics, Vol. 17, No. 2, 01.03.2017, p. 144-148.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McHenry, Megan ; Abramson, Erika L. ; McKenna, Michael P. ; Li, Su Ting T. / Research in Pediatric Residency : National Experience of Pediatric Chief Residents. In: Academic Pediatrics. 2017 ; Vol. 17, No. 2. pp. 144-148.
@article{b644f1aa71914a5f81291f61c774ac5f,
title = "Research in Pediatric Residency: National Experience of Pediatric Chief Residents",
abstract = "Objective To determine factors associated with increased research productivity, satisfaction, and perceived barriers to research within residency from the experience of pediatric chief residents. Methods An online cross-sectional survey was administered to academic year 2014–15 chief residents. Topics assessed included program demographic characteristics, career intentions, research productivity, satisfaction with research training and opportunities, and research barriers. Chi-square and Fisher exact tests were used for descriptive statistics. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to determine factors associated with productivity and research satisfaction. Results The response rate was 63{\%} (165 of 261). Half (82 of 165) were productive in research. Most were satisfied with their quality of research training (55{\%}; 90 of 165) and research opportunities (69{\%}; 114 of 165). Chiefs reporting interest in research were 5 times more likely to be productive than those who did not (odds ratio [OR] = 5.2; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 2.3–11.8). Productive chiefs were more likely to report including research time in future careers (P = .003). Most (83{\%}; 137 of 165) thought their programs were supportive of resident research, but lack of time was frequently cited as a major barrier. Those satisfied with research opportunities were less likely to find lack of training (OR = 0.3; 95{\%} CI, 0.1–0.7) or faculty mentorship (OR = 0.2; 95{\%} CI, 0.0–0.9) as a major barrier. Conclusions Pediatric chief resident interest in research is strongly associated with research productivity during residency, and research productivity is strongly associated with career plans including research time. By cultivating research interest through faculty mentorship, research training, and dedicated time, pediatric residency programs might help foster early research success and, potentially lead to continued engagement with research in trainees' future careers.",
keywords = "chief residents, medical education, pediatrics, research",
author = "Megan McHenry and Abramson, {Erika L.} and McKenna, {Michael P.} and Li, {Su Ting T.}",
year = "2017",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.acap.2016.09.010",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "17",
pages = "144--148",
journal = "Academic Pediatrics",
issn = "1876-2859",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Research in Pediatric Residency

T2 - National Experience of Pediatric Chief Residents

AU - McHenry, Megan

AU - Abramson, Erika L.

AU - McKenna, Michael P.

AU - Li, Su Ting T.

PY - 2017/3/1

Y1 - 2017/3/1

N2 - Objective To determine factors associated with increased research productivity, satisfaction, and perceived barriers to research within residency from the experience of pediatric chief residents. Methods An online cross-sectional survey was administered to academic year 2014–15 chief residents. Topics assessed included program demographic characteristics, career intentions, research productivity, satisfaction with research training and opportunities, and research barriers. Chi-square and Fisher exact tests were used for descriptive statistics. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to determine factors associated with productivity and research satisfaction. Results The response rate was 63% (165 of 261). Half (82 of 165) were productive in research. Most were satisfied with their quality of research training (55%; 90 of 165) and research opportunities (69%; 114 of 165). Chiefs reporting interest in research were 5 times more likely to be productive than those who did not (odds ratio [OR] = 5.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.3–11.8). Productive chiefs were more likely to report including research time in future careers (P = .003). Most (83%; 137 of 165) thought their programs were supportive of resident research, but lack of time was frequently cited as a major barrier. Those satisfied with research opportunities were less likely to find lack of training (OR = 0.3; 95% CI, 0.1–0.7) or faculty mentorship (OR = 0.2; 95% CI, 0.0–0.9) as a major barrier. Conclusions Pediatric chief resident interest in research is strongly associated with research productivity during residency, and research productivity is strongly associated with career plans including research time. By cultivating research interest through faculty mentorship, research training, and dedicated time, pediatric residency programs might help foster early research success and, potentially lead to continued engagement with research in trainees' future careers.

AB - Objective To determine factors associated with increased research productivity, satisfaction, and perceived barriers to research within residency from the experience of pediatric chief residents. Methods An online cross-sectional survey was administered to academic year 2014–15 chief residents. Topics assessed included program demographic characteristics, career intentions, research productivity, satisfaction with research training and opportunities, and research barriers. Chi-square and Fisher exact tests were used for descriptive statistics. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to determine factors associated with productivity and research satisfaction. Results The response rate was 63% (165 of 261). Half (82 of 165) were productive in research. Most were satisfied with their quality of research training (55%; 90 of 165) and research opportunities (69%; 114 of 165). Chiefs reporting interest in research were 5 times more likely to be productive than those who did not (odds ratio [OR] = 5.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.3–11.8). Productive chiefs were more likely to report including research time in future careers (P = .003). Most (83%; 137 of 165) thought their programs were supportive of resident research, but lack of time was frequently cited as a major barrier. Those satisfied with research opportunities were less likely to find lack of training (OR = 0.3; 95% CI, 0.1–0.7) or faculty mentorship (OR = 0.2; 95% CI, 0.0–0.9) as a major barrier. Conclusions Pediatric chief resident interest in research is strongly associated with research productivity during residency, and research productivity is strongly associated with career plans including research time. By cultivating research interest through faculty mentorship, research training, and dedicated time, pediatric residency programs might help foster early research success and, potentially lead to continued engagement with research in trainees' future careers.

KW - chief residents

KW - medical education

KW - pediatrics

KW - research

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85014401971&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85014401971&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.acap.2016.09.010

DO - 10.1016/j.acap.2016.09.010

M3 - Article

C2 - 28259335

AN - SCOPUS:85014401971

VL - 17

SP - 144

EP - 148

JO - Academic Pediatrics

JF - Academic Pediatrics

SN - 1876-2859

IS - 2

ER -