Research on relationship-centered care and healthcare outcomes from the Rochester biopsychosocial program

A self-determination theory integration

Geoffrey C. Williams, Richard Frankel, Thomas L. Campbell, Edward L. Deci

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

81 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Researchers in the Program for Biopsychosocial Studies at the University of Rochester have applied quantitative and qualitative research paradigms to explore the healthcare outcomes associated with relationship-centered patient care. Studies converge to show that when primary care physicians are more relationship-centered (versus physician-centered) patients are likely to display higher satisfaction, better adherence to prescriptions, more maintained behavior change, better physical and psychological health, and to initiate less malpractice litigation. Further, when patients' families have more positive interactions, patients have better physical and psychological health and less healthcare utilization. The results, which are integrated with the self-determination theory concepts of autonomy support and autonomous motivation (Deci and Ryan, 1985), highlight the importance of physicians considering psychological and social factors in providing effective healthcare to patients and their families.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)79-90
Number of pages12
JournalFamilies, Systems and Health
Volume18
Issue number1
StatePublished - Mar 2000
Externally publishedYes

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Personal Autonomy
Delivery of Health Care
Psychology
Research
Physicians
Patient-Centered Care
Qualitative Research
Malpractice
Health
Primary Care Physicians
Jurisprudence
Prescriptions
Motivation
Research Personnel

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Research on relationship-centered care and healthcare outcomes from the Rochester biopsychosocial program : A self-determination theory integration. / Williams, Geoffrey C.; Frankel, Richard; Campbell, Thomas L.; Deci, Edward L.

In: Families, Systems and Health, Vol. 18, No. 1, 03.2000, p. 79-90.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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