Resident-As-Teacher: A Suggested Curriculum for Emergency Medicine

Susan E. Farrell, Charissa Pacella, Daniel Egan, Victoria Hogan, Ernest Wang, Kriti Bhatia, Cherri Hobgood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Resident teaching is a competency that must be recognized, developed, and assessed. The ACGME core competencies include the role of physician as educator to "educate patients and families" and to "facilitate the learning of students and other health care professionals." Residents spend a significant proportion of their time in teaching activities, and students report achieving much of their clinical learning from their interactions with residents. Although many residents enjoy their critical role as teacher, many do not feel well prepared to teach. This article summarizes a preliminary curriculum of modules for a resident teacher-training program for emergency medicine residents. The goal of these modules is to provide learning objectives and an initial structure through which residents could improve basic teaching skills. Many of these skills are adaptable to residents' interactions with each other and with students, other healthcare professionals, and patients. Each module and corresponding teaching exercises can be found at http://www.saem.org.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)677-679
Number of pages3
JournalAcademic Emergency Medicine
Volume13
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Emergency Medicine
Curriculum
Teaching
Learning
Students
Delivery of Health Care
Physician's Role
Exercise
Education

Keywords

  • graduate medical education
  • medical education
  • undergraduate medical education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Resident-As-Teacher : A Suggested Curriculum for Emergency Medicine. / Farrell, Susan E.; Pacella, Charissa; Egan, Daniel; Hogan, Victoria; Wang, Ernest; Bhatia, Kriti; Hobgood, Cherri.

In: Academic Emergency Medicine, Vol. 13, No. 6, 06.2006, p. 677-679.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Farrell, SE, Pacella, C, Egan, D, Hogan, V, Wang, E, Bhatia, K & Hobgood, C 2006, 'Resident-As-Teacher: A Suggested Curriculum for Emergency Medicine', Academic Emergency Medicine, vol. 13, no. 6, pp. 677-679. https://doi.org/10.1197/j.aem.2005.12.014
Farrell SE, Pacella C, Egan D, Hogan V, Wang E, Bhatia K et al. Resident-As-Teacher: A Suggested Curriculum for Emergency Medicine. Academic Emergency Medicine. 2006 Jun;13(6):677-679. https://doi.org/10.1197/j.aem.2005.12.014
Farrell, Susan E. ; Pacella, Charissa ; Egan, Daniel ; Hogan, Victoria ; Wang, Ernest ; Bhatia, Kriti ; Hobgood, Cherri. / Resident-As-Teacher : A Suggested Curriculum for Emergency Medicine. In: Academic Emergency Medicine. 2006 ; Vol. 13, No. 6. pp. 677-679.
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