Resident training in nursing home care

Survey of successful educational strategies

Steven Counsell, P. R. Katz, J. Karuza, G. M. Sullivan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To identify educational strategies for resident training in nursing home care deemed successful by a large number of programs. DESIGN: A mail survey with three follow-up mailings. PARTICIPANTS: Directors of accredited internal medicine and family practice residency programs. MEASUREMENTS: Open- and closed-ended questionnaire eliciting curricular content, instructional strategies, and evaluation techniques from programs offering a nursing home experience. Identification of barriers to implementation of a nursing home curriculum and recommendations for success were requested. MAIN RESULTS: Of the 814 surveys mailed, 537 were returned for a response rate of 66%. Nursing home experiences were required in 86% of family practice residency programs but in only 25% of internal medicine programs. Most geriatric medicine curricular content areas were taught in the nursing home; however, relatively little emphasis was given to rehabilitation, organization, and financing of health care, and coordination of care between acute and chronic settings. Direct patient care, bedside rounds, and lectures were the most common instructional strategies reported. Evaluation approaches included faculty observations, resident attendance, and chart reviews with written and skill-based examinations infrequent. Availability of faculty and conflict with other rotations were identified as the principal barriers to implementation of nursing home rotations. An organized nursing home curriculum supervised by enthusiastic faculty using a longitudinal rotation format with resident involvement in an interdisciplinary team was recommended. CONCLUSIONS: Educational strategies exist for successful implementation of a residency nursing home curriculum. Greater priority must be given to training residents in nursing home care and developing nursing home faculty to substantially increase the number and quality of physicians who practice in this setting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1193-1199
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
Volume42
Issue number11
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

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Home Care Services
Nursing Care
Nursing Homes
Internship and Residency
Curriculum
Family Practice
Internal Medicine
Surveys and Questionnaires
Nursing Faculties
Program Evaluation
Postal Service
Geriatrics
Patient Care
Rehabilitation
Medicine
Organizations
Delivery of Health Care
Physicians

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Resident training in nursing home care : Survey of successful educational strategies. / Counsell, Steven; Katz, P. R.; Karuza, J.; Sullivan, G. M.

In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, Vol. 42, No. 11, 1994, p. 1193-1199.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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