Residential proximity to major roadways is not associated with cardiac function in African Americans: Results from the Jackson heart study

Anne M. Weaver, Gregory A. Wellenius, Wen Chih Wu, De Marc A Hickson, Masoor Kamalesh, ​Yi  ​Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Cardiovascular disease (CVD), including heart failure, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly among African Americans. Exposure to ambient air pollution, such as that produced by vehicular traffic, is believed to be associated with heart failure, possibly by impairing cardiac function. We evaluated the cross-sectional association between residential proximity to major roads, a marker of long-term exposure to traffic-related pollution, and echocardiographic indicators of left and pulmonary vascular function in African Americans enrolled in the Jackson Heart Study (JHS): left ventricular ejection fraction, E-wave velocity, isovolumic relaxation time, left atrial diameter index, and pulmonary artery systolic pressure. We examined these associations using multivariable linear or logistic regression, adjusting for potential confounders. Of 4866 participants at study enrollment, 106 lived

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number581
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume13
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 13 2016

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • Ambient air pollution
  • Cardiac function
  • Distance to road
  • E-wave velocity
  • Ejection fraction
  • Isovolumic relaxation time
  • Left atrial diameter index
  • Pulmonary artery systolic pressure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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