Results of a nurse-delivered intervention on proficiency and nodule detection with breast self-examination.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To determine group differences in breast self-examination (BSE) frequency, proficiency, and nodule detection as a result of belief and/or informational interventions. DESIGN: Prospective, randomized, experimental design using a control group and three intervention groups. Data on outcome measures were collected one year following intervention to determine intervention effect on BSE outcome measures. SAMPLE: Women without breast cancer ranging in age from 35-88 years. METHODS: Graduate research assistants conducted in-home interviews and completed intervention delivery and data collection using a standardized protocol for each experimental group. Interventions included counseling about beliefs regarding BSE and informational counseling with BSE demonstration. A second in-home interview was conducted one year after the intervention to determine its effect on BSE outcome measures. MAIN RESEARCH VARIABLES: Self-recorded frequency, observer-rated proficiency scores, and nodule detection scores. FINDINGS: The group receiving both the belief and information interventions had significantly higher frequency (t = 2.22, p < or = 0.05) and higher proficiency scores (t = 3.22, p < or = 0.01) for BSE than the control group. The control group had significantly lower rates than the belief/information group for observed proficiency of BSE (t = 7.72, p < or = 0.01) and for nodule detection (t = 8.91, p < or = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: The intervention consisting of information, BSE demonstration, and follow-up demonstration significantly increased logged frequency, logged proficiency, observed proficiency, and nodule detection one year postintervention. The group receiving both the belief intervention and information intervention demonstrated the highest nodule detection. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE: BSE teaching should include assessment and discussion about belief toward breast cancer and BSE while providing instruction with return demonstration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)819-824
Number of pages6
JournalOncology Nursing Forum
Volume22
Issue number5
StatePublished - Jun 1995

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Breast Self-Examination
Nurses
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Breast Neoplasms
Control Groups
Counseling
Interviews
Teaching
Nursing
Research Design

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology(nursing)

Cite this

Results of a nurse-delivered intervention on proficiency and nodule detection with breast self-examination. / Champion, Victoria.

In: Oncology Nursing Forum, Vol. 22, No. 5, 06.1995, p. 819-824.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To determine group differences in breast self-examination (BSE) frequency, proficiency, and nodule detection as a result of belief and/or informational interventions. DESIGN: Prospective, randomized, experimental design using a control group and three intervention groups. Data on outcome measures were collected one year following intervention to determine intervention effect on BSE outcome measures. SAMPLE: Women without breast cancer ranging in age from 35-88 years. METHODS: Graduate research assistants conducted in-home interviews and completed intervention delivery and data collection using a standardized protocol for each experimental group. Interventions included counseling about beliefs regarding BSE and informational counseling with BSE demonstration. A second in-home interview was conducted one year after the intervention to determine its effect on BSE outcome measures. MAIN RESEARCH VARIABLES: Self-recorded frequency, observer-rated proficiency scores, and nodule detection scores. FINDINGS: The group receiving both the belief and information interventions had significantly higher frequency (t = 2.22, p < or = 0.05) and higher proficiency scores (t = 3.22, p < or = 0.01) for BSE than the control group. The control group had significantly lower rates than the belief/information group for observed proficiency of BSE (t = 7.72, p < or = 0.01) and for nodule detection (t = 8.91, p < or = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: The intervention consisting of information, BSE demonstration, and follow-up demonstration significantly increased logged frequency, logged proficiency, observed proficiency, and nodule detection one year postintervention. The group receiving both the belief intervention and information intervention demonstrated the highest nodule detection. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE: BSE teaching should include assessment and discussion about belief toward breast cancer and BSE while providing instruction with return demonstration.",
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