Results of the National Pilot Screening Program for Venous Disease by the American Venous Forum

Robert B. McLafferty, Joanne M. Lohr, Joseph A. Caprini, Marc A. Passman, Frank T. Padberg, Thom W. Rooke, Ruth L. Bush, Aamir A. Zakaria, William R. Flinn, Bo G. Eklof, Michael Dalsing, Steven J. Markwell, Thomas W. Wakefield

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Abstract

Objective: This report describes the pilot of a free comprehensive national screening program for venous disease. Methods: The screening process consisted of a venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk assessment, abbreviated duplex examination for venous obstruction and reflux, inspection for signs of chronic venous insufficiency (CVI), and an exit interview. Physicians coordinating the screenings were members of the American Venous Forum. Results: Seventeen institutions screened 476 people (mean, 28 per site; range, 6 to 71). Mean age was 60 years (range, 40 to 91 years), with 78% women and 68% with a body mass index of ≥25. If placed in a situation conducive for VTE, 22 participants (5%) were low risk, 87 (18%) were moderate risk, 186 (39%) were high risk, and 179 (38%) were at very high risk. In 26 people (6%), one or more segments had venous obstruction, and 190 (40%) had one or more segments of venous reflux in the lower extremities. Varicose veins were present in 32%, edema without skin changes in 11%, skin changes attributable to venous disease in 8%, and healed or active venous stasis ulcer in 1.3% (CEAP classification 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6, respectively). Increasing age and increasing deep venous thrombosis risk score significantly correlated with increasing clinical classification, r = 0.09, P = .04, and r = 0.16, P = .0004, respectively. Those participants with reflux in one or more segments were significantly more likely to have a higher clinical classification compared with those with no reflux (P = .0001). Conclusion: The first comprehensive national screening for venous disease was performed. Participants were informed of their risk for VTE if placed in a situation conducive to VTE, screened for evidence of obstruction, reflux, and CVI, and empowered to share their results with their primary care provider.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Vascular Surgery
Volume45
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2007

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Venous Thromboembolism
Venous Insufficiency
Varicose Ulcer
Skin
Varicose Veins
Venous Thrombosis
Lower Extremity
Edema
Primary Health Care
Body Mass Index
Interviews
Physicians

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Surgery

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McLafferty, R. B., Lohr, J. M., Caprini, J. A., Passman, M. A., Padberg, F. T., Rooke, T. W., ... Wakefield, T. W. (2007). Results of the National Pilot Screening Program for Venous Disease by the American Venous Forum. Journal of Vascular Surgery, 45(1). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvs.2006.08.079

Results of the National Pilot Screening Program for Venous Disease by the American Venous Forum. / McLafferty, Robert B.; Lohr, Joanne M.; Caprini, Joseph A.; Passman, Marc A.; Padberg, Frank T.; Rooke, Thom W.; Bush, Ruth L.; Zakaria, Aamir A.; Flinn, William R.; Eklof, Bo G.; Dalsing, Michael; Markwell, Steven J.; Wakefield, Thomas W.

In: Journal of Vascular Surgery, Vol. 45, No. 1, 01.2007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McLafferty, RB, Lohr, JM, Caprini, JA, Passman, MA, Padberg, FT, Rooke, TW, Bush, RL, Zakaria, AA, Flinn, WR, Eklof, BG, Dalsing, M, Markwell, SJ & Wakefield, TW 2007, 'Results of the National Pilot Screening Program for Venous Disease by the American Venous Forum', Journal of Vascular Surgery, vol. 45, no. 1. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvs.2006.08.079
McLafferty, Robert B. ; Lohr, Joanne M. ; Caprini, Joseph A. ; Passman, Marc A. ; Padberg, Frank T. ; Rooke, Thom W. ; Bush, Ruth L. ; Zakaria, Aamir A. ; Flinn, William R. ; Eklof, Bo G. ; Dalsing, Michael ; Markwell, Steven J. ; Wakefield, Thomas W. / Results of the National Pilot Screening Program for Venous Disease by the American Venous Forum. In: Journal of Vascular Surgery. 2007 ; Vol. 45, No. 1.
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AU - Padberg, Frank T.

AU - Rooke, Thom W.

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