Rethinking radiology informatics

Marc Kohli, Keith J. Dreyer, J. Raymond Geis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. Informatics innovations of the past 30 years have improved radiology quality and efficiency immensely. Radiologists are groundbreaking leaders in clinical information technology (IT), and often radiologists and imaging informaticists created, specified, and implemented these technologies, while also carrying the ongoing burdens of training, maintenance, support, and operation of these IT solutions. Being pioneers of clinical IT had advantages of local radiology control and radiology-centric products and services. As health care businesses become more clinically IT savvy, however, they are standardizing IT products and procedures across the enterprise, resulting in the loss of radiologists' local control and flexibility. Although this inevitable consequence may provide new opportunities in the long run, several questions arise. Conclusion. What will happen to the informatics expertise within the radiology domain? Will radiology's current and future concerns be heard and their needs addressed? What should radiologists do to understand, obtain, and use informatics products to maximize efficiency and provide the most value and quality for patients and the greater health care community? This article will propose some insights and considerations as we rethink radiology informatics.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)716-720
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Roentgenology
Volume204
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2015

Fingerprint

Informatics
Radiology
Technology
Delivery of Health Care
Training Support
Maintenance
Radiologists

Keywords

  • Data science
  • Decision support
  • Future of radiology
  • Imaging informatics
  • Informatics
  • Radiology work flow

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Kohli, M., Dreyer, K. J., & Raymond Geis, J. (2015). Rethinking radiology informatics. American Journal of Roentgenology, 204(4), 716-720. https://doi.org/10.2214/AJR.14.13840

Rethinking radiology informatics. / Kohli, Marc; Dreyer, Keith J.; Raymond Geis, J.

In: American Journal of Roentgenology, Vol. 204, No. 4, 01.04.2015, p. 716-720.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kohli, M, Dreyer, KJ & Raymond Geis, J 2015, 'Rethinking radiology informatics', American Journal of Roentgenology, vol. 204, no. 4, pp. 716-720. https://doi.org/10.2214/AJR.14.13840
Kohli, Marc ; Dreyer, Keith J. ; Raymond Geis, J. / Rethinking radiology informatics. In: American Journal of Roentgenology. 2015 ; Vol. 204, No. 4. pp. 716-720.
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