Retracted

Relation of atherosclerotic cardiovascular events to progression of aortic stenosis in older men

Masoor Kamalesh, Charlotte Ng, George J. Eckert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Aortic stenosis (AS) is now considered to be an active disease like atherosclerosis. However, therapies such as statins have not shown benefit in AS patientswhen studied prospectively. Hypothesis: We tested the hypothesis that if AS was indeed similar to atherosclerosis, then subjects with progressive AS should have a higher atherosclerosis related event rate than those without progression of AS. Methods: Two readers independently measured the aortic valve area using a continuity equation in 164 consecutive subjects with AS between January 1997 through March 2005, referred to our laboratory for serial echocardiograms for AS. Subjects with no progression of AS were compared to subjects with progression of reduction in valve area with regards to baseline demographics, occurrence of allmyocardial infarctions, stroke, unstable angina requiring hospitalization, and coronary revascularization. A X2 test were use to compare the groups for differences in endpoints. Results: The study cohort included164males age 70±9 years. Age, low-density lipoprotein level, hypertension, or diabetes status were similar among the 2 groups, while the no progression group had more smokers and fewer patients on statins (P<.05). Aortic stenosis progressed in 99 subjects (60% of total) during mean follow-up of 2.5 years. A total of 28 patients had cardiovascular events (9 myocardial infarctions, 1 stroke, 20 coronary revascularizations, 5 unstable angina requiring hospitalization).Of these, 8 (12%) occurred in the no progression group and 20 (20%) occurred in the progression group (P = .16). Conclusions: Progressive AS is not paralleled with increased occurrence of atherosclerotic cardiovascular events despite described similarities in risk factors for AS and atherosclerosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)119-121
Number of pages3
JournalClinical Cardiology
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2010

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Aortic Valve Stenosis
Atherosclerosis
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors
Unstable Angina
Hospitalization
Stroke
Aortic Valve
LDL Lipoproteins
Infarction
Cohort Studies
Myocardial Infarction
Demography
Hypertension

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Retracted : Relation of atherosclerotic cardiovascular events to progression of aortic stenosis in older men. / Kamalesh, Masoor; Ng, Charlotte; Eckert, George J.

In: Clinical Cardiology, Vol. 33, No. 2, 02.2010, p. 119-121.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: Aortic stenosis (AS) is now considered to be an active disease like atherosclerosis. However, therapies such as statins have not shown benefit in AS patientswhen studied prospectively. Hypothesis: We tested the hypothesis that if AS was indeed similar to atherosclerosis, then subjects with progressive AS should have a higher atherosclerosis related event rate than those without progression of AS. Methods: Two readers independently measured the aortic valve area using a continuity equation in 164 consecutive subjects with AS between January 1997 through March 2005, referred to our laboratory for serial echocardiograms for AS. Subjects with no progression of AS were compared to subjects with progression of reduction in valve area with regards to baseline demographics, occurrence of allmyocardial infarctions, stroke, unstable angina requiring hospitalization, and coronary revascularization. A X2 test were use to compare the groups for differences in endpoints. Results: The study cohort included164males age 70±9 years. Age, low-density lipoprotein level, hypertension, or diabetes status were similar among the 2 groups, while the no progression group had more smokers and fewer patients on statins (P<.05). Aortic stenosis progressed in 99 subjects (60{\%} of total) during mean follow-up of 2.5 years. A total of 28 patients had cardiovascular events (9 myocardial infarctions, 1 stroke, 20 coronary revascularizations, 5 unstable angina requiring hospitalization).Of these, 8 (12{\%}) occurred in the no progression group and 20 (20{\%}) occurred in the progression group (P = .16). Conclusions: Progressive AS is not paralleled with increased occurrence of atherosclerotic cardiovascular events despite described similarities in risk factors for AS and atherosclerosis.",
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N2 - Background: Aortic stenosis (AS) is now considered to be an active disease like atherosclerosis. However, therapies such as statins have not shown benefit in AS patientswhen studied prospectively. Hypothesis: We tested the hypothesis that if AS was indeed similar to atherosclerosis, then subjects with progressive AS should have a higher atherosclerosis related event rate than those without progression of AS. Methods: Two readers independently measured the aortic valve area using a continuity equation in 164 consecutive subjects with AS between January 1997 through March 2005, referred to our laboratory for serial echocardiograms for AS. Subjects with no progression of AS were compared to subjects with progression of reduction in valve area with regards to baseline demographics, occurrence of allmyocardial infarctions, stroke, unstable angina requiring hospitalization, and coronary revascularization. A X2 test were use to compare the groups for differences in endpoints. Results: The study cohort included164males age 70±9 years. Age, low-density lipoprotein level, hypertension, or diabetes status were similar among the 2 groups, while the no progression group had more smokers and fewer patients on statins (P<.05). Aortic stenosis progressed in 99 subjects (60% of total) during mean follow-up of 2.5 years. A total of 28 patients had cardiovascular events (9 myocardial infarctions, 1 stroke, 20 coronary revascularizations, 5 unstable angina requiring hospitalization).Of these, 8 (12%) occurred in the no progression group and 20 (20%) occurred in the progression group (P = .16). Conclusions: Progressive AS is not paralleled with increased occurrence of atherosclerotic cardiovascular events despite described similarities in risk factors for AS and atherosclerosis.

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