Reverse electrical pacing improves intestinal absorption and transit time

Alan Sawchuk, W. Nogami, S. Goto, J. Yount, J. A. Grosfeld, J. Lohmuller, M. D. Grosfeld, J. L. Grosfeld

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

This study evaluates the effect of reverse electrical pacing on intestinal absorption and transit time in an enterostomy model. Twenty-five male Sprague-Dawley rats (148 to 208 gm) underwent division and anastomosis of the proximal jejunum to eliminate the proximal gastroduodenal pacemaker. A 30.0 cm loop ileostomy was formed, and leads were placed at 1.0 and 3.0 cm proximal to the stoma. Reverse pacing was done with a 0.25 Hz, 50 msec pulse at 0.1 mA. Transit time was evaluated with 1.0 ml barium gavage and was 12 ± 4 minutes in group I controls (n = 13) versus 27 ± 21 minutes in group II (n = 12) reverse-paced rats (p < 0.025). D-xylose absorption was determined in 18 rats. Levels were 14.0 ± 3.6 mg/dl in control rats (n = 6) and 15.5 ± 3.4 mg/dl in reverse-paced rats (n = 6). Increasing the pulse milliamperage to 2.0 mA (n = 6) increased D-xylose serum levels to 38.8 ± 27.7 mg/dl (p < 0.05). Transit rate and net water flux were determined in eight additional rats with 15 cm Theiry-Vella loops. Transit rate was measured with 0.2 ml of methylene blue and was 3.00 ± 2.32 ml/min in unpaced rats compared with 9.95 ± 0.71 ml/min with reverse pacing (p < 0.025). Water flux studies showed that control rats had a net secretory loss of 0.20 ± 0.48 ml/cm while paced rats absorbed 0.08 ± 0.12 ml/cm. These data indicate that reverse electrical pacing increases transit time and nutrient and fluid absorption. These observations suggest that reverse electrical pacing may be a useful adjunct in instances of short gut associated with an enterostomy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)454-460
Number of pages7
JournalSurgery
Volume100
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1986

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Intestinal Absorption
Enterostomy
Xylose
Ileostomy
Water
Methylene Blue
Jejunum
Barium
Sprague Dawley Rats
Food
Control Groups
Serum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Sawchuk, A., Nogami, W., Goto, S., Yount, J., Grosfeld, J. A., Lohmuller, J., ... Grosfeld, J. L. (1986). Reverse electrical pacing improves intestinal absorption and transit time. Surgery, 100(2), 454-460.

Reverse electrical pacing improves intestinal absorption and transit time. / Sawchuk, Alan; Nogami, W.; Goto, S.; Yount, J.; Grosfeld, J. A.; Lohmuller, J.; Grosfeld, M. D.; Grosfeld, J. L.

In: Surgery, Vol. 100, No. 2, 1986, p. 454-460.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sawchuk, A, Nogami, W, Goto, S, Yount, J, Grosfeld, JA, Lohmuller, J, Grosfeld, MD & Grosfeld, JL 1986, 'Reverse electrical pacing improves intestinal absorption and transit time', Surgery, vol. 100, no. 2, pp. 454-460.
Sawchuk A, Nogami W, Goto S, Yount J, Grosfeld JA, Lohmuller J et al. Reverse electrical pacing improves intestinal absorption and transit time. Surgery. 1986;100(2):454-460.
Sawchuk, Alan ; Nogami, W. ; Goto, S. ; Yount, J. ; Grosfeld, J. A. ; Lohmuller, J. ; Grosfeld, M. D. ; Grosfeld, J. L. / Reverse electrical pacing improves intestinal absorption and transit time. In: Surgery. 1986 ; Vol. 100, No. 2. pp. 454-460.
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