Risk factors for recurrent severe anemia among previously transfused children in Uganda: An age-matched case-control study

Aggrey Dhabangi, Richard Idro, Chandy John, Walter H. Dzik, Robert Opoka, Ronald Ssenyonga, Michael Boele Van Hensbroek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: In resource-poor settings, transfused children often experience recurrence of severe anemia (SA) following discharge from hospital. This study determined the factors associated with recurrent severe anemia (RSA) among previously transfused Ugandan children aged less than 5 years. Methods: A case-control study was conducted in five hospitals in Uganda from March 2017 to September 2018. We prospectively enrolled 196 hospitalised children who had been transfused for severe anemia 2 weeks to 6 months prior to enrollment. Of these, 101 children (cases) were re-admitted with a hemoglobin [Hb] level of ≤6 g/dL and required transfusion; and 95 children (age-matched controls) were admitted for other clinical illness with a Hb > 6 g/dL. Children known to have sickle cell anemia, cancer, or bleeding disorders were excluded. Clinical and laboratory evaluation were done. Conditional logistic regression adjusted for age, was used to determine factors associated with RSA. Results: The median time (IQR) between the earlier transfusion and enrollment was 3.5 (1.9-5.7) months for cases, and was 5.0 (2.9-6.0) months for controls (p-value = 0.015). Risk factors (adjusted odds ratio, 95% confidence interval, and significance) for development of RSA were: hemoglobinuria (36.33, 2.19-600.66, p = 0.012); sickle cell anemia - newly diagnosed (20.26, 2.33-176.37, p = 0.006); history of earlier previous transfusions (6.95, 1.36-35.61, p = 0.020) and malaria infection (6.47, 1.17-35.70, p = 0.032). Conclusion: Malaria chemoprevention, follow up visit for Hb check after discharge from hospital and sickle cell screening among previously transfused children represent practical strategies to prevent and identify children at risk for recurrent severe anemia. The cause of hemoglobinuria in children merits further investigations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number27
JournalBMC Pediatrics
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 18 2019
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Uganda
Case-Control Studies
Anemia
Hemoglobinuria
Hemoglobins
Sickle Cell Anemia
Malaria
Hospitalized Child
Chemoprevention
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Hemorrhage
Recurrence
Infection

Keywords

  • Children
  • Hemoglobinuria
  • Malaria
  • Recurrent severe anemia
  • Sickle cell anemia
  • Transfusion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Risk factors for recurrent severe anemia among previously transfused children in Uganda : An age-matched case-control study. / Dhabangi, Aggrey; Idro, Richard; John, Chandy; Dzik, Walter H.; Opoka, Robert; Ssenyonga, Ronald; Van Hensbroek, Michael Boele.

In: BMC Pediatrics, Vol. 19, No. 1, 27, 18.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dhabangi, Aggrey ; Idro, Richard ; John, Chandy ; Dzik, Walter H. ; Opoka, Robert ; Ssenyonga, Ronald ; Van Hensbroek, Michael Boele. / Risk factors for recurrent severe anemia among previously transfused children in Uganda : An age-matched case-control study. In: BMC Pediatrics. 2019 ; Vol. 19, No. 1.
@article{fb1b86ae243b4c51926403f2bde984c7,
title = "Risk factors for recurrent severe anemia among previously transfused children in Uganda: An age-matched case-control study",
abstract = "Background: In resource-poor settings, transfused children often experience recurrence of severe anemia (SA) following discharge from hospital. This study determined the factors associated with recurrent severe anemia (RSA) among previously transfused Ugandan children aged less than 5 years. Methods: A case-control study was conducted in five hospitals in Uganda from March 2017 to September 2018. We prospectively enrolled 196 hospitalised children who had been transfused for severe anemia 2 weeks to 6 months prior to enrollment. Of these, 101 children (cases) were re-admitted with a hemoglobin [Hb] level of ≤6 g/dL and required transfusion; and 95 children (age-matched controls) were admitted for other clinical illness with a Hb > 6 g/dL. Children known to have sickle cell anemia, cancer, or bleeding disorders were excluded. Clinical and laboratory evaluation were done. Conditional logistic regression adjusted for age, was used to determine factors associated with RSA. Results: The median time (IQR) between the earlier transfusion and enrollment was 3.5 (1.9-5.7) months for cases, and was 5.0 (2.9-6.0) months for controls (p-value = 0.015). Risk factors (adjusted odds ratio, 95{\%} confidence interval, and significance) for development of RSA were: hemoglobinuria (36.33, 2.19-600.66, p = 0.012); sickle cell anemia - newly diagnosed (20.26, 2.33-176.37, p = 0.006); history of earlier previous transfusions (6.95, 1.36-35.61, p = 0.020) and malaria infection (6.47, 1.17-35.70, p = 0.032). Conclusion: Malaria chemoprevention, follow up visit for Hb check after discharge from hospital and sickle cell screening among previously transfused children represent practical strategies to prevent and identify children at risk for recurrent severe anemia. The cause of hemoglobinuria in children merits further investigations.",
keywords = "Children, Hemoglobinuria, Malaria, Recurrent severe anemia, Sickle cell anemia, Transfusion",
author = "Aggrey Dhabangi and Richard Idro and Chandy John and Dzik, {Walter H.} and Robert Opoka and Ronald Ssenyonga and {Van Hensbroek}, {Michael Boele}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "18",
doi = "10.1186/s12887-019-1398-6",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "19",
journal = "BMC Pediatrics",
issn = "1471-2431",
publisher = "BioMed Central",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Risk factors for recurrent severe anemia among previously transfused children in Uganda

T2 - An age-matched case-control study

AU - Dhabangi, Aggrey

AU - Idro, Richard

AU - John, Chandy

AU - Dzik, Walter H.

AU - Opoka, Robert

AU - Ssenyonga, Ronald

AU - Van Hensbroek, Michael Boele

PY - 2019/1/18

Y1 - 2019/1/18

N2 - Background: In resource-poor settings, transfused children often experience recurrence of severe anemia (SA) following discharge from hospital. This study determined the factors associated with recurrent severe anemia (RSA) among previously transfused Ugandan children aged less than 5 years. Methods: A case-control study was conducted in five hospitals in Uganda from March 2017 to September 2018. We prospectively enrolled 196 hospitalised children who had been transfused for severe anemia 2 weeks to 6 months prior to enrollment. Of these, 101 children (cases) were re-admitted with a hemoglobin [Hb] level of ≤6 g/dL and required transfusion; and 95 children (age-matched controls) were admitted for other clinical illness with a Hb > 6 g/dL. Children known to have sickle cell anemia, cancer, or bleeding disorders were excluded. Clinical and laboratory evaluation were done. Conditional logistic regression adjusted for age, was used to determine factors associated with RSA. Results: The median time (IQR) between the earlier transfusion and enrollment was 3.5 (1.9-5.7) months for cases, and was 5.0 (2.9-6.0) months for controls (p-value = 0.015). Risk factors (adjusted odds ratio, 95% confidence interval, and significance) for development of RSA were: hemoglobinuria (36.33, 2.19-600.66, p = 0.012); sickle cell anemia - newly diagnosed (20.26, 2.33-176.37, p = 0.006); history of earlier previous transfusions (6.95, 1.36-35.61, p = 0.020) and malaria infection (6.47, 1.17-35.70, p = 0.032). Conclusion: Malaria chemoprevention, follow up visit for Hb check after discharge from hospital and sickle cell screening among previously transfused children represent practical strategies to prevent and identify children at risk for recurrent severe anemia. The cause of hemoglobinuria in children merits further investigations.

AB - Background: In resource-poor settings, transfused children often experience recurrence of severe anemia (SA) following discharge from hospital. This study determined the factors associated with recurrent severe anemia (RSA) among previously transfused Ugandan children aged less than 5 years. Methods: A case-control study was conducted in five hospitals in Uganda from March 2017 to September 2018. We prospectively enrolled 196 hospitalised children who had been transfused for severe anemia 2 weeks to 6 months prior to enrollment. Of these, 101 children (cases) were re-admitted with a hemoglobin [Hb] level of ≤6 g/dL and required transfusion; and 95 children (age-matched controls) were admitted for other clinical illness with a Hb > 6 g/dL. Children known to have sickle cell anemia, cancer, or bleeding disorders were excluded. Clinical and laboratory evaluation were done. Conditional logistic regression adjusted for age, was used to determine factors associated with RSA. Results: The median time (IQR) between the earlier transfusion and enrollment was 3.5 (1.9-5.7) months for cases, and was 5.0 (2.9-6.0) months for controls (p-value = 0.015). Risk factors (adjusted odds ratio, 95% confidence interval, and significance) for development of RSA were: hemoglobinuria (36.33, 2.19-600.66, p = 0.012); sickle cell anemia - newly diagnosed (20.26, 2.33-176.37, p = 0.006); history of earlier previous transfusions (6.95, 1.36-35.61, p = 0.020) and malaria infection (6.47, 1.17-35.70, p = 0.032). Conclusion: Malaria chemoprevention, follow up visit for Hb check after discharge from hospital and sickle cell screening among previously transfused children represent practical strategies to prevent and identify children at risk for recurrent severe anemia. The cause of hemoglobinuria in children merits further investigations.

KW - Children

KW - Hemoglobinuria

KW - Malaria

KW - Recurrent severe anemia

KW - Sickle cell anemia

KW - Transfusion

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85060175396&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85060175396&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/s12887-019-1398-6

DO - 10.1186/s12887-019-1398-6

M3 - Article

C2 - 30658602

AN - SCOPUS:85060175396

VL - 19

JO - BMC Pediatrics

JF - BMC Pediatrics

SN - 1471-2431

IS - 1

M1 - 27

ER -