Risk for colorectal cancer in persons with a family history of adenomatous polyps, A systematic review

Thomas Imperiale, David F. Ransohoff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The risk for colorectal cancer (CRC) is unclear for persons who have first-degree relatives with adenomatous polyps (adenomas). Purpose: To determine the validity of studies about this issue. Data Sources: MEDLINE and Cochrane databases from 1966 through 2011. Study Selection: Sequential review of titles, abstracts, and text from retrieved articles. Data Extraction: Study objective, study design, and numbers in study groups. Data Synthesis: Ten studies were identified that have been used to answer the question, "Does having a first-degree relative with an adenoma increase the risk for CRC?" We determined that they instead answer the question, "Does having a first-degree relative with CRC increase the risk for an adenoma?" We identified 2 additional studies that provide more relevant information. One study showed that the risk for CRC in persons who have firstdegree relatives with adenomas is greater than the risk in persons who do not have first-degree relatives with adenomas (2.31% vs. 0.53%; relative risk, 4.36 [95% CI, 1.60 to 10.21]). The other study showed that the risk for CRC or large adenomas (≥1 cm) in persons who have first-degree relatives with large adenomas is greater than the risk in persons whose first-degree relatives do not have adenomas or CRC (8.3% vs. 4.2%; adjusted odds ratio, 2.27 [CI, 1.01 to 5.09]). Limitation: Even the 2 relevant studies have design problems that affect validity and generalizability. Conclusion: Most studies that are cited for the risk for CRC when relatives have adenomas do not address the issue. The 2 studies that do address the issue suggest an increased risk but have important methodological limitations. Properly designed studies are needed to measure the risk and identify the factors that modify it. Primary Funding Source: National Cancer Institute.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)703-709
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of Internal Medicine
Volume156
Issue number10
StatePublished - 2012

Fingerprint

Adenomatous Polyps
Adenoma
Colorectal Neoplasms
National Cancer Institute (U.S.)
Information Storage and Retrieval
MEDLINE
Odds Ratio
Databases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Risk for colorectal cancer in persons with a family history of adenomatous polyps, A systematic review. / Imperiale, Thomas; Ransohoff, David F.

In: Annals of Internal Medicine, Vol. 156, No. 10, 2012, p. 703-709.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{8cdd0a48a6b44270ac281300247a0c0e,
title = "Risk for colorectal cancer in persons with a family history of adenomatous polyps, A systematic review",
abstract = "Background: The risk for colorectal cancer (CRC) is unclear for persons who have first-degree relatives with adenomatous polyps (adenomas). Purpose: To determine the validity of studies about this issue. Data Sources: MEDLINE and Cochrane databases from 1966 through 2011. Study Selection: Sequential review of titles, abstracts, and text from retrieved articles. Data Extraction: Study objective, study design, and numbers in study groups. Data Synthesis: Ten studies were identified that have been used to answer the question, {"}Does having a first-degree relative with an adenoma increase the risk for CRC?{"} We determined that they instead answer the question, {"}Does having a first-degree relative with CRC increase the risk for an adenoma?{"} We identified 2 additional studies that provide more relevant information. One study showed that the risk for CRC in persons who have firstdegree relatives with adenomas is greater than the risk in persons who do not have first-degree relatives with adenomas (2.31{\%} vs. 0.53{\%}; relative risk, 4.36 [95{\%} CI, 1.60 to 10.21]). The other study showed that the risk for CRC or large adenomas (≥1 cm) in persons who have first-degree relatives with large adenomas is greater than the risk in persons whose first-degree relatives do not have adenomas or CRC (8.3{\%} vs. 4.2{\%}; adjusted odds ratio, 2.27 [CI, 1.01 to 5.09]). Limitation: Even the 2 relevant studies have design problems that affect validity and generalizability. Conclusion: Most studies that are cited for the risk for CRC when relatives have adenomas do not address the issue. The 2 studies that do address the issue suggest an increased risk but have important methodological limitations. Properly designed studies are needed to measure the risk and identify the factors that modify it. Primary Funding Source: National Cancer Institute.",
author = "Thomas Imperiale and Ransohoff, {David F.}",
year = "2012",
language = "English",
volume = "156",
pages = "703--709",
journal = "Annals of Internal Medicine",
issn = "0003-4819",
publisher = "American College of Physicians",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Risk for colorectal cancer in persons with a family history of adenomatous polyps, A systematic review

AU - Imperiale, Thomas

AU - Ransohoff, David F.

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Background: The risk for colorectal cancer (CRC) is unclear for persons who have first-degree relatives with adenomatous polyps (adenomas). Purpose: To determine the validity of studies about this issue. Data Sources: MEDLINE and Cochrane databases from 1966 through 2011. Study Selection: Sequential review of titles, abstracts, and text from retrieved articles. Data Extraction: Study objective, study design, and numbers in study groups. Data Synthesis: Ten studies were identified that have been used to answer the question, "Does having a first-degree relative with an adenoma increase the risk for CRC?" We determined that they instead answer the question, "Does having a first-degree relative with CRC increase the risk for an adenoma?" We identified 2 additional studies that provide more relevant information. One study showed that the risk for CRC in persons who have firstdegree relatives with adenomas is greater than the risk in persons who do not have first-degree relatives with adenomas (2.31% vs. 0.53%; relative risk, 4.36 [95% CI, 1.60 to 10.21]). The other study showed that the risk for CRC or large adenomas (≥1 cm) in persons who have first-degree relatives with large adenomas is greater than the risk in persons whose first-degree relatives do not have adenomas or CRC (8.3% vs. 4.2%; adjusted odds ratio, 2.27 [CI, 1.01 to 5.09]). Limitation: Even the 2 relevant studies have design problems that affect validity and generalizability. Conclusion: Most studies that are cited for the risk for CRC when relatives have adenomas do not address the issue. The 2 studies that do address the issue suggest an increased risk but have important methodological limitations. Properly designed studies are needed to measure the risk and identify the factors that modify it. Primary Funding Source: National Cancer Institute.

AB - Background: The risk for colorectal cancer (CRC) is unclear for persons who have first-degree relatives with adenomatous polyps (adenomas). Purpose: To determine the validity of studies about this issue. Data Sources: MEDLINE and Cochrane databases from 1966 through 2011. Study Selection: Sequential review of titles, abstracts, and text from retrieved articles. Data Extraction: Study objective, study design, and numbers in study groups. Data Synthesis: Ten studies were identified that have been used to answer the question, "Does having a first-degree relative with an adenoma increase the risk for CRC?" We determined that they instead answer the question, "Does having a first-degree relative with CRC increase the risk for an adenoma?" We identified 2 additional studies that provide more relevant information. One study showed that the risk for CRC in persons who have firstdegree relatives with adenomas is greater than the risk in persons who do not have first-degree relatives with adenomas (2.31% vs. 0.53%; relative risk, 4.36 [95% CI, 1.60 to 10.21]). The other study showed that the risk for CRC or large adenomas (≥1 cm) in persons who have first-degree relatives with large adenomas is greater than the risk in persons whose first-degree relatives do not have adenomas or CRC (8.3% vs. 4.2%; adjusted odds ratio, 2.27 [CI, 1.01 to 5.09]). Limitation: Even the 2 relevant studies have design problems that affect validity and generalizability. Conclusion: Most studies that are cited for the risk for CRC when relatives have adenomas do not address the issue. The 2 studies that do address the issue suggest an increased risk but have important methodological limitations. Properly designed studies are needed to measure the risk and identify the factors that modify it. Primary Funding Source: National Cancer Institute.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84861165924&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84861165924&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 22586009

AN - SCOPUS:84861165924

VL - 156

SP - 703

EP - 709

JO - Annals of Internal Medicine

JF - Annals of Internal Medicine

SN - 0003-4819

IS - 10

ER -