Risk of mortality for dementia in a developing country: The Yoruba in Nigeria

Anthony J. Perkins, Siu Hui, Adesola Ogunniyi, Oyewusi Gureje, Olusegun Baiyewu, Frederick Unverzagt, Sujuan Gao, Kathleen Hall, Beverly S. Musick, Hugh Hendrie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Limited data exist on the impact of dementia in developing nations, including its association with mortality. Objective: The purpose of this paper is to assess the relationship between dementia and five-year mortality on a community dwelling elderly Yoruba population in the developing country of Nigeria and to compare those results with those from an elderly African-American community in Indianapolis. Methods: A two-phase design was used to ascertain dementia status in two sites. In the first phase, the Community Screening Instrument for Dementia (CSI-D) was administered. In the second phase, subjects were sampled for the clinical assessment according to their CSI-D performance category. Proportional hazards regression was used to assess the relationship between mortality and cognitive status at both sites after adjusting for demographics and chronic disease conditions. Results: For the entire screened population, poor and intermediate performance on the CSI-D is associated with increased mortality at both sites; however the effect of CSI-D performance did not significantly differ between the two sites. For the clinically assessed sample, dementia was significantly associated with increased mortality at both sites (Ibadan RR = 2.83, Indianapolis RR = 2.05), but the effect was not significantly different across the two sites. Conclusion: Dementia resulted in an increased risk of mortality for Yoruba of a magnitude similar to African-Americans suggesting that the impact of dementia on mortality risk may be similar for developing and developed countries.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)566-573
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Volume17
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

Fingerprint

Nigeria
Developing Countries
Dementia
Mortality
African Americans
Independent Living
Developed Countries
Population
Chronic Disease
Demography

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Dementia
  • Developing country
  • Mortality
  • Sub-Sahara Africa
  • Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Risk of mortality for dementia in a developing country : The Yoruba in Nigeria. / Perkins, Anthony J.; Hui, Siu; Ogunniyi, Adesola; Gureje, Oyewusi; Baiyewu, Olusegun; Unverzagt, Frederick; Gao, Sujuan; Hall, Kathleen; Musick, Beverly S.; Hendrie, Hugh.

In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Vol. 17, No. 6, 2002, p. 566-573.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Perkins, Anthony J. ; Hui, Siu ; Ogunniyi, Adesola ; Gureje, Oyewusi ; Baiyewu, Olusegun ; Unverzagt, Frederick ; Gao, Sujuan ; Hall, Kathleen ; Musick, Beverly S. ; Hendrie, Hugh. / Risk of mortality for dementia in a developing country : The Yoruba in Nigeria. In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. 2002 ; Vol. 17, No. 6. pp. 566-573.
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