Role of alveolar macrophage-T cell adherence in accessory cell function in human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals.

Homer Twigg, D. M. Soliman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous work has shown that alveolar macrophages (AM) from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients are superior accessory cells (AC) and secrete greater amounts of T cell-stimulatory cytokines than do normal AM. We now examine the role of AM-T cell adherence in AM AC function by examining the ability of beta 2 integrins and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) to block adherence and lymphoproliferation. Mitogen-induced (concanavalin A, pokeweed mitogen) adhesion and proliferation were studied in the presence and absence of mAb directed against beta 2 integrins and ICAM-1. AM from normal subjects and HIV-positive patients were used as AC, and normal T cells were used as responders. Normal and HIV AM bound equal numbers of T cells under similar conditions. Adherence was blocked by antibodies to beta 2 integrins and ICAM-1 in both groups. Con A-induced lymphoproliferation was positively correlated with adherence in normal volunteers. In contrast, greater Con A-induced AM-T cell adherence in HIV-positive patients was associated with worse AC function. Antibodies that impaired AM-T cell adherence completely inhibited AC function in both groups when added at the beginning of mitogen assays, indicating that initial contact was required. However, the addition of antibodies after 4 h inhibited lymphoproliferation less in HIV-infected individuals than in normal volunteers, suggesting that prolonged AM-T cell adherence was less important for optimal AC function in these patients. Using these and previous results, we present a model for AM AC function in normal volunteers and HIV-infected individuals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)138-146
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology
Volume11
Issue number2
StatePublished - Aug 1994

Fingerprint

T-cells
Alveolar Macrophages
Accessories
Viruses
HIV
T-Lymphocytes
Integrin beta Chains
Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1
Integrins
Healthy Volunteers
Mitogens
Antibodies
Pokeweed Mitogens
Concanavalin A
Assays
Adhesion
Cytokines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

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abstract = "Previous work has shown that alveolar macrophages (AM) from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients are superior accessory cells (AC) and secrete greater amounts of T cell-stimulatory cytokines than do normal AM. We now examine the role of AM-T cell adherence in AM AC function by examining the ability of beta 2 integrins and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) to block adherence and lymphoproliferation. Mitogen-induced (concanavalin A, pokeweed mitogen) adhesion and proliferation were studied in the presence and absence of mAb directed against beta 2 integrins and ICAM-1. AM from normal subjects and HIV-positive patients were used as AC, and normal T cells were used as responders. Normal and HIV AM bound equal numbers of T cells under similar conditions. Adherence was blocked by antibodies to beta 2 integrins and ICAM-1 in both groups. Con A-induced lymphoproliferation was positively correlated with adherence in normal volunteers. In contrast, greater Con A-induced AM-T cell adherence in HIV-positive patients was associated with worse AC function. Antibodies that impaired AM-T cell adherence completely inhibited AC function in both groups when added at the beginning of mitogen assays, indicating that initial contact was required. However, the addition of antibodies after 4 h inhibited lymphoproliferation less in HIV-infected individuals than in normal volunteers, suggesting that prolonged AM-T cell adherence was less important for optimal AC function in these patients. Using these and previous results, we present a model for AM AC function in normal volunteers and HIV-infected individuals.",
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