Role of bone-modifying agents in multiple myeloma: American society of clinical oncology clinical practice guideline update

Kenneth Anderson, Nofisat Ismaila, Patrick J. Flynn, Susan Halabi, Sundar Jagannath, Mohammed S. Ogaily, Jim Omel, Noopur Raje, G. David Roodman, Gary C. Yee, Robert A. Kyle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To update guideline recommendations on the role of bone-modifying agents in multiple myeloma. Methods: An update panel conducted a targeted systematic literature review by searching PubMed and the Cochrane Library for randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, meta-analyses, clinical practice guidelines, and observational studies. Results: Thirty-five relevant studies were identified, and updated evidence supports the current recommendations. Recommendations: For patients with active symptomatic multiple myeloma that requires systemic therapy with or without evidence of lytic destruction of bone or compression fracture of the spine from osteopenia on plain radiograph(s) or other imaging studies, intravenous administration of pamidronate 90 mg over at least 2 hours or zoledronic acid 4 mg over at least 15 minutes every 3 to 4 weeks is recommended. Denosumab has shown to be noninferior to zoledronic acid for the prevention of skeletal-related events and provides an alternative. Fewer adverse events related to renal toxicity have been noted with denosumab compared with zoledronic acid and may be preferred in this setting. The update panel recommends that clinicians consider reducing the initial pamidronate dose in patients with preexisting renal impairment. Zoledronic acid has not been studied in patients with severe renal impairment and is not recommended in this setting. The update panel suggests that bone-modifying treatment continue for up to 2 years. Less frequent dosing has been evaluated and should be considered in patients with responsive or stable disease. Continuous use is at the discretion of the treating physician and the risk of ongoing skeletal morbidity. Retreatment should be initiated at the time of disease relapse. The update panel discusses measures regarding osteonecrosis of the jaw.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)812-818
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Clinical Oncology
Volume36
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 10 2018

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zoledronic acid
pamidronate
Medical Oncology
Multiple Myeloma
Practice Guidelines
Bone and Bones
Kidney
Compression Fractures
Retreatment
Osteonecrosis
Metabolic Bone Diseases
Bone Fractures
Jaw
PubMed
Intravenous Administration
Libraries
Observational Studies
Meta-Analysis
Spine
Randomized Controlled Trials

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Role of bone-modifying agents in multiple myeloma : American society of clinical oncology clinical practice guideline update. / Anderson, Kenneth; Ismaila, Nofisat; Flynn, Patrick J.; Halabi, Susan; Jagannath, Sundar; Ogaily, Mohammed S.; Omel, Jim; Raje, Noopur; Roodman, G. David; Yee, Gary C.; Kyle, Robert A.

In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, Vol. 36, No. 8, 10.03.2018, p. 812-818.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Anderson, K, Ismaila, N, Flynn, PJ, Halabi, S, Jagannath, S, Ogaily, MS, Omel, J, Raje, N, Roodman, GD, Yee, GC & Kyle, RA 2018, 'Role of bone-modifying agents in multiple myeloma: American society of clinical oncology clinical practice guideline update', Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 36, no. 8, pp. 812-818. https://doi.org/10.1200/JCO.2017.76.6402
Anderson, Kenneth ; Ismaila, Nofisat ; Flynn, Patrick J. ; Halabi, Susan ; Jagannath, Sundar ; Ogaily, Mohammed S. ; Omel, Jim ; Raje, Noopur ; Roodman, G. David ; Yee, Gary C. ; Kyle, Robert A. / Role of bone-modifying agents in multiple myeloma : American society of clinical oncology clinical practice guideline update. In: Journal of Clinical Oncology. 2018 ; Vol. 36, No. 8. pp. 812-818.
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