Role of HOXA9 in leukemia

Dysregulation, cofactors and essential targets

C. T. Collins, Jay Hess

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

HOXA9 is a homeodomain-containing transcription factor that has an important role in hematopoietic stem cell expansion and is commonly deregulated in acute leukemias. A variety of upstream genetic alterations in acute myeloid leukemia lead to overexpression of HOXA9, which is a strong predictor of poor prognosis. In many cases, HOXA9 has been shown to be necessary for maintaining leukemic transformation; however, the molecular mechanisms through which it promotes leukemogenesis remain elusive. Recent work has established that HOXA9 regulates downstream gene expression through binding at promoter distal enhancers along with a subset of cell-specific cofactor and collaborator proteins. Increasing efforts are being made to identify both the critical cofactors and target genes required for maintaining transformation in HOXA9-overexpressing leukemias. With continued advances in understanding HOXA9-mediated transformation, there is a wealth of opportunity for developing novel therapeutics that would be applicable for greater than 50% of AML with overexpression of HOXA9.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1090-1098
Number of pages9
JournalOncogene
Volume35
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 3 2016

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Leukemia
Hematopoietic Stem Cells
Acute Myeloid Leukemia
Transcription Factors
Gene Expression
Genes
Proteins
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Cancer Research
  • Genetics

Cite this

Role of HOXA9 in leukemia : Dysregulation, cofactors and essential targets. / Collins, C. T.; Hess, Jay.

In: Oncogene, Vol. 35, No. 9, 03.03.2016, p. 1090-1098.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Collins, C. T. ; Hess, Jay. / Role of HOXA9 in leukemia : Dysregulation, cofactors and essential targets. In: Oncogene. 2016 ; Vol. 35, No. 9. pp. 1090-1098.
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