Role of pathology in the multidisciplinary management of patients with prostate cancer

Rodolfo Montironi, Roberta Mazzucchelli, Marina Scarpelli, Antonio Lopez-Beltran, Andrea B. Galosi, Liang Cheng

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

A problem when handling radical prostatectomy specimens (RPS) is that prostate cancer is notoriously difficult to identify at gross examination, and the tumor extent is always underestimated by the naked eye. For the pathologist, the safest method to avoid undersampling of cancer is that the entire prostate is submitted. Even though whole mounts of sections from RPS appear not to be superior to sections from standard blocks in detecting adverse pathological features, their use has the great advantage of displaying the architecture of the prostate and the identification and location of tumour nodules more clearly, and make it easier to compare the pathological findings with those obtained from digital rectal examination (DRE), transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and prostate biopsies. This chapter is based on the Ancona (Italy) protocol for the evaluation of the RPS with complete sampling with whole mount sections.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMultidisciplinary Management of Prostate Cancer: The Role of the Prostate Cancer Unit
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Pages29-41
Number of pages13
ISBN (Print)9783319043852, 3319043846, 9783319043845
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2013

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Prostatectomy
Prostate
Prostatic Neoplasms
Pathology
Digital Rectal Examination
Neoplasms
Italy
Biopsy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Montironi, R., Mazzucchelli, R., Scarpelli, M., Lopez-Beltran, A., Galosi, A. B., & Cheng, L. (2013). Role of pathology in the multidisciplinary management of patients with prostate cancer. In Multidisciplinary Management of Prostate Cancer: The Role of the Prostate Cancer Unit (pp. 29-41). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-04385-2_4

Role of pathology in the multidisciplinary management of patients with prostate cancer. / Montironi, Rodolfo; Mazzucchelli, Roberta; Scarpelli, Marina; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Galosi, Andrea B.; Cheng, Liang.

Multidisciplinary Management of Prostate Cancer: The Role of the Prostate Cancer Unit. Springer International Publishing, 2013. p. 29-41.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Montironi, R, Mazzucchelli, R, Scarpelli, M, Lopez-Beltran, A, Galosi, AB & Cheng, L 2013, Role of pathology in the multidisciplinary management of patients with prostate cancer. in Multidisciplinary Management of Prostate Cancer: The Role of the Prostate Cancer Unit. Springer International Publishing, pp. 29-41. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-04385-2_4
Montironi R, Mazzucchelli R, Scarpelli M, Lopez-Beltran A, Galosi AB, Cheng L. Role of pathology in the multidisciplinary management of patients with prostate cancer. In Multidisciplinary Management of Prostate Cancer: The Role of the Prostate Cancer Unit. Springer International Publishing. 2013. p. 29-41 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-04385-2_4
Montironi, Rodolfo ; Mazzucchelli, Roberta ; Scarpelli, Marina ; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio ; Galosi, Andrea B. ; Cheng, Liang. / Role of pathology in the multidisciplinary management of patients with prostate cancer. Multidisciplinary Management of Prostate Cancer: The Role of the Prostate Cancer Unit. Springer International Publishing, 2013. pp. 29-41
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