Role of routine stentograms following urinary diversion in modern practice.

Stanton M. Regan, Stephen D. Beck, Richard Bihrle, Richard Foster

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To examine the usefulness of routine stentograms in patient management following urinary diversion. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective review of all patients undergoing urinary diversion from February 2004 to February 2007 was performed. Three hundred twenty-six patients were identified. One hundred fifty patients were excluded: 101 patients had no stentogram and 49 patients had incomplete records or follow up. RESULTS: Of the 176 patients, ureteral anastamosic leak was detected in three of 344 ureters (0.9%). The ureteral stents were left in situ until the leaks resolved. None of the three developed a ureteral stricture. Ten (3.0%) ureters had delayed drainage and the stents were removed as scheduled. One patient developed hydronephrosis from a retained portion of the ureteral stent. The 328 ureters (95.4%) with normal stentograms were followed for 30 weeks (3-144). Four ureters (1.25%) developed distal ureteral strictures and one patient developed a ureteral tumor recurrence. No patient developed a poststentogram complication. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of a ureteral enteric anastamotic leak detected by stentogram is less than 1%-2%. Routine stentograms do not appear necessary in stable patients without clinical signs of a urine leak and thus are now only seldom performed at our institution.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4660-4663
Number of pages4
JournalCanadian Journal of Urology
Volume16
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jun 2009

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Urinary Diversion
Ureter
Stents
Pathologic Constriction
Hydronephrosis
Drainage
Urine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Role of routine stentograms following urinary diversion in modern practice. / Regan, Stanton M.; Beck, Stephen D.; Bihrle, Richard; Foster, Richard.

In: Canadian Journal of Urology, Vol. 16, No. 3, 06.2009, p. 4660-4663.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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