Roles for nitric oxide in venular-to-arteriolar and arteriolar-to-arteriolar communication

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Communication of tissue requirements for blood flow with resistance arterioles of the small intestine represents a major regulatory challenge. The primary metabolic tissue is the mucosa but most of the resistance regulation occurs in large arterioles within the submucosa. Two forms of communication are known to occur. First, as small arterioles in the mucosa change resistance, flow-dependent mechanisms involving nitric oxide (NO) occur in the larger arterioles. Secondly, venular-to-arteriolar communication through vasoactive molecules in blood increase NO formation by venules and arterioles.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAnnals of Biomedical Engineering
Volume28
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
StatePublished - 2000

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Nitric oxide
Communication
Blood
Tissue
Molecules
Mucous Membrane

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Roles for nitric oxide in venular-to-arteriolar and arteriolar-to-arteriolar communication. / Bohlen, H.

In: Annals of Biomedical Engineering, Vol. 28, No. SUPPL. 1, 2000.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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