Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker’s Yeast) as an interfering RNA expression and delivery system

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The broad application of RNA interference for disease prevention is dependent upon the production of dsRNA in an economically feasible, scalable, and sustainable fashion, as well as the identification of safe and effective methods for RNA delivery. Current research has sparked interest in the use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for these applications. This review examines the potential for commercial development of yeast interfering RNA expression and delivery systems. S. cerevisiae is a genetic model organism that lacks a functional RNA interference system, which may make it an ideal system for expression and accumulation of high levels of recombinant interfering RNA. Moreover, recent studies in a variety of eukaryotic species suggest that this microbe may be an excellent and safe system for interfering RNA delivery. Key areas for further research and development include optimization of interfering RNA expression in S. cerevisiae, industrial-sized scaling of recombinant yeast cultures in which interfering RNA molecules are expressed, the development of methods for largescale drying of yeast that preserve interfering RNA integrity, and identification of encapsulating agents that promote yeast stability in various environmental conditions. The genetic tractability of S. cerevisiae and a long history of using this microbe in both the food and pharmaceutical industry will facilitate further development of this promising new technology, which has many potential applications of medical importance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)942-952
Number of pages11
JournalCurrent Drug Targets
Volume20
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Yeast
Saccharomyces cerevisiae
RNA
Yeasts
RNA Interference
Food Industry
Genetic Models
Drug Industry
Research
Technology
Drying
Molecules
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Aedes aegypti
  • Anopheles gambiae
  • Bioengineering
  • Biopharmaceutical
  • Gene therapy
  • Mosquito
  • RNAi
  • ShRNA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Pharmacology
  • Drug Discovery
  • Clinical Biochemistry

Cite this

Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker’s Yeast) as an interfering RNA expression and delivery system. / Scheel, Molly.

In: Current Drug Targets, Vol. 20, No. 9, 01.01.2019, p. 942-952.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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