Sacral neuromodulation in diabetic patients

Success and complications in the treatment of voiding dysfunction

David H. Daniels, Charles Powell, Matthew R. Braasch, Karl J. Kreder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims: We compared success rates, subsequent complications, and possible indications for success of sacral neuromodulation (SNM) for urinary voiding dysfunction in diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Methods: Thirty-two diabetic patients (mean age 61.8 years, range 27-83) with urge incontinence, urgency-frequency syndrome, and/or urinary retention refractory to non-surgical treatment were retrospectively evaluated along with 211 non-diabetic patients (mean age 54.1 years, range 20-86) with similar symptoms. All patients who experienced ≥50% reduction in urinary symptoms following a 7- to 21-day test period went on to permanent SNM device implantation. Results: No significant difference was found with respect to successful conversion rates from the test period to permanent implantation between diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Long-term success rates at a mean followup of 29.3 months following permanent device implantation for diabetic patients were 69.2% of those with urge incontinence, 85.7% of those with urgency-frequency, and 66.7% of those with urinary retention. The non-diabetic cohort had success rates of 67.0% for urge incontinence, 67.8% for urgency/frequency, and 58.2% for urinary retention (P = 0.823, 0.157, and 0.631, respectively). No patient experienced intraoperative complications. Nine of 24 (37.5%) devices were explanted postoperatively in diabetic patients compared with 36 of 141 (25.5%) in non-diabetic patients (P = 0.224). The number of explants due to infection was higher in diabetic patients (16.7%) versus nondiabetic patients (4.3%; P = 0.018). Conclusions: No difference in long-term success rates was seen in diabetic patients when compared with similar, non-diabetic patients. Diabetic patients did, however, have a higher incidence of device explantation due to infection. Neurourol. Urodynam. 29:578-581, 2010.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)578-581
Number of pages4
JournalNeurourology and Urodynamics
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Urge Urinary Incontinence
Therapeutics
Urinary Retention
Equipment and Supplies
Intraoperative Complications
Infection
Incidence

Keywords

  • Diabetes
  • Neuromodulation
  • Outcomes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Urology

Cite this

Sacral neuromodulation in diabetic patients : Success and complications in the treatment of voiding dysfunction. / Daniels, David H.; Powell, Charles; Braasch, Matthew R.; Kreder, Karl J.

In: Neurourology and Urodynamics, Vol. 29, No. 4, 04.2010, p. 578-581.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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