Safety issues related to retroviral-mediated gene transfer in humans

Kenneth Cornetta, Richard A. Morgan, W. French Anderson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

183 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The first three approved human clinical trials utilizing retroviral-mediated gene transfer are now underway. While this technology holds great promise for the study and treatment of human disease, it also poses a number of safety concerns. In evaluating clinical protocols, potential complications and the likelihood of their occurrence are estimated by review committees so that a risk/benefit assessment can be made. Current knowledge, reviewed in this article, suggests that no acute complications secondary to retroviral-mediated gene transfer are likely, but the possibility of long-term or unforeseen sequelae in patients suggests the need for post-treatment monitoring.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5-14
Number of pages10
JournalHuman Gene Therapy
Volume2
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1991
Externally publishedYes

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Safety
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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics

Cite this

Safety issues related to retroviral-mediated gene transfer in humans. / Cornetta, Kenneth; Morgan, Richard A.; Anderson, W. French.

In: Human Gene Therapy, Vol. 2, No. 1, 1991, p. 5-14.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cornetta, Kenneth ; Morgan, Richard A. ; Anderson, W. French. / Safety issues related to retroviral-mediated gene transfer in humans. In: Human Gene Therapy. 1991 ; Vol. 2, No. 1. pp. 5-14.
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