Salvage chemotherapy for recurrent germ cell cancer

C. R. Nichols, B. J. Roth, Patrick Loehrer, S. D. Williams, Lawrence Einhorn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Clinical trials of chemotherapy in germ cell cancer have explored the full range of the relationship of chemotherapy dose and intensity. In good-risk patients, successful efforts have diminished the duration of treatment or number of drugs required to reliably cure the illness. In patients with a poor prognosis, efforts to intensify therapy have been undertaken. In the setting of disease recurrence after primary chemotherapy, the outlook is considerably less hopeful, as only 20% to 30% of patients survive recurrent illness. Current standard treatment in this setting is combination therapy with ifosfamide and cisplatin, given with either etoposide or vinblastine. High-dose chemotherapy with bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell support can cure a small portion of selected patients with multiple recurrences of germ cell cancer. The impact of earlier treatment with high-dose chemotherapy (either as initial salvage therapy or primary treatment) is less certain. Clinical trials in these settings have not yet demonstrated a definite advantage over less toxic conventional-dose therapies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)102-108
Number of pages7
JournalSeminars in Oncology
Volume21
Issue number5 SUPPL. 12
StatePublished - 1994

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Germ Cell and Embryonal Neoplasms
Drug Therapy
Therapeutics
Clinical Trials
Recurrence
Salvage Therapy
Ifosfamide
Vinblastine
Poisons
Etoposide
Cisplatin
Bone Marrow
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

Cite this

Nichols, C. R., Roth, B. J., Loehrer, P., Williams, S. D., & Einhorn, L. (1994). Salvage chemotherapy for recurrent germ cell cancer. Seminars in Oncology, 21(5 SUPPL. 12), 102-108.

Salvage chemotherapy for recurrent germ cell cancer. / Nichols, C. R.; Roth, B. J.; Loehrer, Patrick; Williams, S. D.; Einhorn, Lawrence.

In: Seminars in Oncology, Vol. 21, No. 5 SUPPL. 12, 1994, p. 102-108.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nichols, CR, Roth, BJ, Loehrer, P, Williams, SD & Einhorn, L 1994, 'Salvage chemotherapy for recurrent germ cell cancer', Seminars in Oncology, vol. 21, no. 5 SUPPL. 12, pp. 102-108.
Nichols CR, Roth BJ, Loehrer P, Williams SD, Einhorn L. Salvage chemotherapy for recurrent germ cell cancer. Seminars in Oncology. 1994;21(5 SUPPL. 12):102-108.
Nichols, C. R. ; Roth, B. J. ; Loehrer, Patrick ; Williams, S. D. ; Einhorn, Lawrence. / Salvage chemotherapy for recurrent germ cell cancer. In: Seminars in Oncology. 1994 ; Vol. 21, No. 5 SUPPL. 12. pp. 102-108.
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