Schizophrenia: From genetics to biology to predictive medicine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Identifying genes for psychiatric disorders using traditional genetic approaches has thus far proven quite difficult. Reasons for this include the complexity of these disorders and the poor definition of the clinical phenotype. However, recent studies have demonstrated the power of an approach called convergent functional genomics (CFG). CFG is a methodology that integrates different types of data to increase the ability to identify genes involved in various psychiatric and nonpsychiatric disorders. The work exemplified in this article integrated human brain and blood gene expression data, relevant animal model brain and blood gene expression data, and human genetic data to identify candidate genes and blood biomarkers for schizophrenia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4-7
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Clinical Psychiatry
Volume75
Issue numberSUPPL. 2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Schizophrenia
Medicine
Genomics
Psychiatry
Genes
Gene Expression
Aptitude
Medical Genetics
Brain
Animal Models
Biomarkers
Phenotype
Gene
Blood
Methodology
Animal Model

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Schizophrenia : From genetics to biology to predictive medicine. / Niculescu, Alexander.

In: Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, Vol. 75, No. SUPPL. 2, 2014, p. 4-7.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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