Scholarly activity in academic plastic surgery: the gender difference

Sarah E. Sasor, Julia A. Cook, Stephen P. Duquette, Scott N. Loewenstein, Sidhbh Gallagher, Sunil S. Tholpady, Michael W. Chu, Leonidas Koniaris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The number of women in medicine has grown rapidly in recent years. Women constitute over 50% of medical school graduates and hold 38% of faculty positions at United States medical schools. Despite this, gender disparities remain prevalent in most surgical subspecialties, including plastic surgery. The purpose of this study was to analyze gender authorship trends. Materials and methods: A cross-sectional study of academic plastic surgeons was performed. Data were collected from departmental websites and online resources. National Institute of Health (NIH) funding was determined using the Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools database. Number of published articles and h-index were obtained from Scopus (Elsevier Inc, New York, NY). Statistical analysis was performed in SPSS (SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL). Results: A total of 814 plastic surgeons were identified in the United States. Compared to men, women had significantly fewer years in practice (P <0.001), lower academic ranks (P <0.001), and published less (P <0.001). There was no difference in the number of PhD degrees between genders; women with PhDs published less than men with PhDs (P = 0.04). 5.1% of women and 6.9% of men received NIH funding during their career (P = 0.57). There was no gender difference in scholarly output among NIH-funded surgeons. Overall, years in practice, academic rank, chief/program director title, advanced degrees, and NIH funding all positively correlated with academic productivity. Conclusions: This study identifies significant gender disparities in scholarly productivity among plastic surgeons in academia. Future efforts should focus on improving gender equality and eliminating barriers to academic development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)332-336
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Surgical Research
Volume229
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2018

Fingerprint

Plastic Surgery
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Medical Schools
Authorship
Cross-Sectional Studies
Medicine
Databases
Surgeons
Research

Keywords

  • Academic plastic surgery
  • Academic productivity
  • Gender differences
  • H-index
  • Scholarly output
  • Women in surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Sasor, S. E., Cook, J. A., Duquette, S. P., Loewenstein, S. N., Gallagher, S., Tholpady, S. S., ... Koniaris, L. (2018). Scholarly activity in academic plastic surgery: the gender difference. Journal of Surgical Research, 229, 332-336. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jss.2018.04.031

Scholarly activity in academic plastic surgery : the gender difference. / Sasor, Sarah E.; Cook, Julia A.; Duquette, Stephen P.; Loewenstein, Scott N.; Gallagher, Sidhbh; Tholpady, Sunil S.; Chu, Michael W.; Koniaris, Leonidas.

In: Journal of Surgical Research, Vol. 229, 01.09.2018, p. 332-336.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sasor, SE, Cook, JA, Duquette, SP, Loewenstein, SN, Gallagher, S, Tholpady, SS, Chu, MW & Koniaris, L 2018, 'Scholarly activity in academic plastic surgery: the gender difference', Journal of Surgical Research, vol. 229, pp. 332-336. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jss.2018.04.031
Sasor SE, Cook JA, Duquette SP, Loewenstein SN, Gallagher S, Tholpady SS et al. Scholarly activity in academic plastic surgery: the gender difference. Journal of Surgical Research. 2018 Sep 1;229:332-336. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jss.2018.04.031
Sasor, Sarah E. ; Cook, Julia A. ; Duquette, Stephen P. ; Loewenstein, Scott N. ; Gallagher, Sidhbh ; Tholpady, Sunil S. ; Chu, Michael W. ; Koniaris, Leonidas. / Scholarly activity in academic plastic surgery : the gender difference. In: Journal of Surgical Research. 2018 ; Vol. 229. pp. 332-336.
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abstract = "Background: The number of women in medicine has grown rapidly in recent years. Women constitute over 50{\%} of medical school graduates and hold 38{\%} of faculty positions at United States medical schools. Despite this, gender disparities remain prevalent in most surgical subspecialties, including plastic surgery. The purpose of this study was to analyze gender authorship trends. Materials and methods: A cross-sectional study of academic plastic surgeons was performed. Data were collected from departmental websites and online resources. National Institute of Health (NIH) funding was determined using the Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools database. Number of published articles and h-index were obtained from Scopus (Elsevier Inc, New York, NY). Statistical analysis was performed in SPSS (SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL). Results: A total of 814 plastic surgeons were identified in the United States. Compared to men, women had significantly fewer years in practice (P <0.001), lower academic ranks (P <0.001), and published less (P <0.001). There was no difference in the number of PhD degrees between genders; women with PhDs published less than men with PhDs (P = 0.04). 5.1{\%} of women and 6.9{\%} of men received NIH funding during their career (P = 0.57). There was no gender difference in scholarly output among NIH-funded surgeons. Overall, years in practice, academic rank, chief/program director title, advanced degrees, and NIH funding all positively correlated with academic productivity. Conclusions: This study identifies significant gender disparities in scholarly productivity among plastic surgeons in academia. Future efforts should focus on improving gender equality and eliminating barriers to academic development.",
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