SCREENING THE ASYMPTOMATIC PATIENT FOR CAROTID ATHEROSCLEROSIS.

P. J. Bendick, Valerie Jackson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The prevalence and clinical significance of carotid artery occlusive disease in patients potentially 'at risk' are largely unknown. Using duplex sonography, the authors screened 417 vessels of 212 asymptomatic patients. The patients were chosen for their potential risk for carotid atherosclerosis. Some were over 55 years of age and were scheduled for major surgery; others were chosen on the basis of the presence of an asymptomatic carotid bruit or the presence of known lower extremity atherosclerotic disease requiring vascular reconstruction. The presence of mild disease (1-29% diameter reduction) was noted in 113 vessels (27%), moderate disease (30-69%) in 163 vessels (39%), severe disease (70-99%) in 36 vessels (9%), and total occlusion in 12 vessels (3%). Of those vessels with moderate disease, 73 had greater than 50% stenoses, potentially of hemodynamic significance. It is concluded that duplex scanning is an effective means of evaluating patients 'at risk. '

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationIEEE/Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society Annual Conference
EditorsJames L. Semmlow, Walter Welkowitz
PublisherIEEE
Pages455-457
Number of pages3
StatePublished - 1984

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Bendick, P. J., & Jackson, V. (1984). SCREENING THE ASYMPTOMATIC PATIENT FOR CAROTID ATHEROSCLEROSIS. In J. L. Semmlow, & W. Welkowitz (Eds.), IEEE/Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society Annual Conference (pp. 455-457). IEEE.