Secondary prevention of cancer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To review criteria for mass cancer screening among asymptomatic populations and barriers to secondary prevention of breast, cervical, and colorectal cancers. To describe challenges to implementing theoretically based interventions to increase appropriate cancer screening, follow-up, and surveillance. DATA SOURCES: Published journal articles, text books, and epidemiologic reports. CONCLUSION: Interventions to increase breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening participation must be approached from a systems perspective that includes patient, health care provider, and health care system variables. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE: Understanding the array of factors that impede progress in the secondary prevention of cancer is necessary to improve care. Nurses have an important role in decreasing morbidity and mortality from breast, cervical, and colorectal cancers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)252-259
Number of pages8
JournalSeminars in Oncology Nursing
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2005

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Secondary Prevention
Early Detection of Cancer
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Colorectal Neoplasms
Breast Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Mass Screening
Health Personnel
Patient Care
Nursing
Nurses
Morbidity
Delivery of Health Care
Mortality
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Oncology

Cite this

Secondary prevention of cancer. / Champion, Victoria; Rawl, Susan.

In: Seminars in Oncology Nursing, Vol. 21, No. 4, 11.2005, p. 252-259.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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