Self-referred mammography patients: Analysis of patients' characteristics

H. E. Reynolds, Valerie Jackson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Among mammography patients, a small but growing group of highly motivated women refer themselves directly for screening without the suggestion of their physicians. We surveyed 485 patients during a 3-month period to study how self-referred mammography patients differ from physician-referred patients. Self-referred patients were more likely than physician-referred patients to have a family income of more than $30,000 per year, to be college graduates, and to consider their health as good or excellent. A large percentage of self-referred patients performed other health-promoting practices, but were not significantly more likely to do these than were physician-referred patients. Women who referred themselves were more likely to have a friend with breast cancer and to believe that cancer could be cured. They expressed much less worry about radiation exposure and were more likely to consider $50.00 an appropriate charge for a screening mammogram. By far, the greatest motivator for self-referred patients was health promotion and disease prevention. Self-referred mammography patients tend to be wealthier, more educated, and less concerned about the cost and radiation dose of mammography when compared with physician-referred mammography patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)481-484
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Roentgenology
Volume157
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1991

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Mammography
Physicians
Health
Health Promotion
Radiation
Breast Neoplasms
Costs and Cost Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Self-referred mammography patients : Analysis of patients' characteristics. / Reynolds, H. E.; Jackson, Valerie.

In: American Journal of Roentgenology, Vol. 157, No. 3, 1991, p. 481-484.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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