Sensor to detect endothelialization on an active coronary stent

Katherine M. Musick, Arthur C. Coffey, Pedro P. Irazoqui

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: A serious complication with drug-eluting coronary stents is late thrombosis, caused by exposed stent struts not covered by endothelial cells in the healing process. Real-time detection of this healing process could guide physicians for more individualized anti-platelet therapy. Here we present work towards developing a sensor to detect this healing process. Sensors on several stent struts could give information about the heterogeneity of healing across the stent.Methods: A piezoelectric microcantilever was insulated with parylene and demonstrated as an endothelialization detector for incorporation within an active coronary stent. After initial characterization, endothelial cells were plated onto the cantilever surface. After they attached to the surface, they caused an increase in mass, and thus a decrease in the resonant frequencies of the cantilever. This shift was then detected electrically with an LCR meter. The self-sensing, self-actuating cantilever does not require an external, optical detection system, thus allowing for implanted applications.Results: A cell density of 1300 cells/mm2 on the cantilever surface is detected.Conclusions: We have developed a self-actuating, self-sensing device for detecting the presence of endothelial cells on a surface. The device is biocompatible and functions reliably in ionic liquids, making it appropriate for implantable applications. This sensor can be placed along the struts of a coronary stent to detect when the struts have been covered with a layer of endothelial cells and are no longer available surfaces for clot formation. Anti-platelet therapy can be adjusted in real-time with respect to a patient's level of healing and hemorrhaging risks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number67
JournalBioMedical Engineering Online
Volume9
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 4 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Stents
Struts
Endothelial cells
Endothelial Cells
Sensors
Platelets
Blood Platelets
Ionic Liquids
Equipment and Supplies
Optical Devices
Drug-Eluting Stents
Ionic liquids
Thrombosis
Cell Count
Natural frequencies
Physicians
Detectors
Therapeutics
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Sensor to detect endothelialization on an active coronary stent. / Musick, Katherine M.; Coffey, Arthur C.; Irazoqui, Pedro P.

In: BioMedical Engineering Online, Vol. 9, 67, 04.11.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Musick, Katherine M. ; Coffey, Arthur C. ; Irazoqui, Pedro P. / Sensor to detect endothelialization on an active coronary stent. In: BioMedical Engineering Online. 2010 ; Vol. 9.
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