Serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, oral health and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Xuan Zhou, Jing Han, Yiqing Song, Jing Zhang, Zuomin Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Aim To evaluate the associations of serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] levels with periodontal health and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Material and Methods We conducted a case-control study of 193 COPD patients and 181 controls. Their periodontal status and lung function were examined, and serum 25(OH)D levels were measured. Results Mean serum 25(OH)D concentrations were significantly lower in the COPD group than in the controls (32.1 versus 35.8 nmol/l; p = 0.002). Serum 25(OH)D concentrations were positively correlated with lung function among non-smokers and negatively correlated with plaque index (PLI) among former smokers. After adjustment for age, gender, body mass index, season and smoking status, periodontal indexes were significantly associated with serum 25(OH)D concentrations (number of remaining teeth among all groups; probing depth, clinical attachment level, bleeding index, PLI and alveolar bone loss among COPD group). Lower serum 25(OH)D concentrations were significantly associated with an increased risk of COPD among former smokers (Odd ratio 4.11; 95% confidence interval 1.47-11.5; p = 0.007) after adjustment for periodontal indexes and other variables. Conclusions Lower serum 25(OH)D concentrations were significantly associated with poor periodontal health and an increased risk of COPD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)350-356
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Clinical Periodontology
Volume39
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • 25-hydroxyvitamin D
  • Chinese subjects
  • case-control study
  • chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
  • periodontitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Periodontics

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