Serum selenium and risk of prostate cancer in U.S. blacks and whites

Tara M. Vogt, Regina G. Ziegler, Barry I. Graubard, Christine A. Swanson, Raymond S. Greenberg, Janet B. Schoenberg, G. Marie Swanson, Richard B. Hayes, Susan T. Mayne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

98 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Prostate cancer is the fourth most common cancer in men worldwide and the most common cancer in men in the United States, with reported incidence rates for U.S. blacks being the highest in the world. The etiology of prostate cancer and an explanation for the racial disparity in incidence in the United States remain elusive. Epidemiologic studies suggest that selenium, an essential trace element, may protect against the disease. To further explore this hypothesis, we measured serum selenium in 212 cases and 233 controls participating in a multicenter, population-based case-control study that included comparable numbers of U.S. black and white men aged 40-79 years. Serum selenium was inversely associated with risk of prostate cancer (comparing highest to lowest quartiles, OR = 0.71, 95% CI 0.39-1.28; p for trend = 0.11), with similar patterns seen in both blacks and whites. Cubic regression spline analysis of continuous serum selenium indicated a reduced risk of prostate cancer above concentrations of 0.135 μg/ml (median among controls) compared to a reference value set at the median of the lowest selenium quartile. Because both the selenoenzyme GPX and vitamin E can function as antioxidants, we also explored their joint effect. Consistent with other studies, the inverse association with selenium was strongest among men with low serum α-tocopherol concentrations. In conclusion, our results suggest a moderately reduced risk of prostate cancer at higher serum selenium concentrations, a finding that can now be extended to include U.S. blacks. Since selenium exposure varies widely throughout the world, further research on optimal concentrations for cancer prevention is justified.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)664-670
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Cancer
Volume103
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 20 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Selenium
Prostatic Neoplasms
Serum
Neoplasms
Tocopherols
hydroquinone
Incidence
Trace Elements
Vitamin E
Case-Control Studies
Epidemiologic Studies
Reference Values
Antioxidants
Regression Analysis
Research
Population

Keywords

  • Biomarkers
  • Diet
  • Epidemiology
  • Prostate cancer
  • Race
  • Selenium
  • Vitamin E

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Vogt, T. M., Ziegler, R. G., Graubard, B. I., Swanson, C. A., Greenberg, R. S., Schoenberg, J. B., ... Mayne, S. T. (2003). Serum selenium and risk of prostate cancer in U.S. blacks and whites. International Journal of Cancer, 103(5), 664-670. https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.10866

Serum selenium and risk of prostate cancer in U.S. blacks and whites. / Vogt, Tara M.; Ziegler, Regina G.; Graubard, Barry I.; Swanson, Christine A.; Greenberg, Raymond S.; Schoenberg, Janet B.; Swanson, G. Marie; Hayes, Richard B.; Mayne, Susan T.

In: International Journal of Cancer, Vol. 103, No. 5, 20.02.2003, p. 664-670.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vogt, TM, Ziegler, RG, Graubard, BI, Swanson, CA, Greenberg, RS, Schoenberg, JB, Swanson, GM, Hayes, RB & Mayne, ST 2003, 'Serum selenium and risk of prostate cancer in U.S. blacks and whites', International Journal of Cancer, vol. 103, no. 5, pp. 664-670. https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.10866
Vogt TM, Ziegler RG, Graubard BI, Swanson CA, Greenberg RS, Schoenberg JB et al. Serum selenium and risk of prostate cancer in U.S. blacks and whites. International Journal of Cancer. 2003 Feb 20;103(5):664-670. https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.10866
Vogt, Tara M. ; Ziegler, Regina G. ; Graubard, Barry I. ; Swanson, Christine A. ; Greenberg, Raymond S. ; Schoenberg, Janet B. ; Swanson, G. Marie ; Hayes, Richard B. ; Mayne, Susan T. / Serum selenium and risk of prostate cancer in U.S. blacks and whites. In: International Journal of Cancer. 2003 ; Vol. 103, No. 5. pp. 664-670.
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