Sexual Health Research With Young Black Men Who Have Sex With Men

Experiences of Benefits and Harms

Renata Arrington-Sanders, Anthony Morgan, Jessica Oidtman, Ann Dao, Margaret Moon, J. Fortenberry, Mary Ott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Young Black men who have sex with men (YBMSM) are often underrepresented in sexual health research because of concerns about safety, privacy, and the potential for research harms. Empirical data are needed to understand YBMSM experience of participating in research, benefits and harms (discomfort), to inform policy and regulatory decisions. Using qualitative methods, this article examines 50 YBMSM, aged 15–19 years, experiences of benefits/harms, challenges of participating in sexual health research, and contextual factors impacting research experiences. Participants were asked about benefits and harms experienced in answering questions about sexual orientation, first same-sex attraction, and same-sex sexual experiences after completing an in-depth interview. Interviews were transcribed and coded. Inductive open coding was used to identify themes within and between interviews. Participants were able to describe perceived direct benefits resulting from research interview participation, including awareness of risky sexual behaviors, a safe space to share early coming out stories and same-sex sexual experiences, and a sense of empowerment and comfort with one’s sexual orientation. Indirect benefits described by participants included perceptions of helping others and the larger gay community. Few participants described harms (discomfort recalling experiences). Our data suggest that participating in qualitative sexual health research focused on sexual orientation, sexual attraction, and early same-sex sexual experiences may result in minimal harms for YBMSM and multiple benefits, including feeling more comfortable than in a general medical visit.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalArchives of Sexual Behavior
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Apr 4 2016

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Reproductive Health
Research
Sexual Behavior
Interviews
Health Research
Sexual Health
Harm
Privacy
Emotions
Sexual
Safety
Sexual Orientation

Keywords

  • Harms and benefits
  • Institutional review boards (IRBs)
  • Sexual health research participation
  • Sexual orientation
  • Young Black men who have sex with men (YBMSM)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Sexual Health Research With Young Black Men Who Have Sex With Men : Experiences of Benefits and Harms. / Arrington-Sanders, Renata; Morgan, Anthony; Oidtman, Jessica; Dao, Ann; Moon, Margaret; Fortenberry, J.; Ott, Mary.

In: Archives of Sexual Behavior, 04.04.2016, p. 1-10.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Arrington-Sanders, Renata ; Morgan, Anthony ; Oidtman, Jessica ; Dao, Ann ; Moon, Margaret ; Fortenberry, J. ; Ott, Mary. / Sexual Health Research With Young Black Men Who Have Sex With Men : Experiences of Benefits and Harms. In: Archives of Sexual Behavior. 2016 ; pp. 1-10.
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