Short-term in vivo stability of endothelial-lined polyester elastomer and polytetrafluoroethylene grafts

Kenneth Kesler, Malcolm B. Herring, Michael P. Arnold, Howard M. Park, Sally Baughman, John L. Glover

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A fibronectin substrate will significantly enhance the strength of endothelial cell attachment on grafts constructed of polyester elastomer (PE) and polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE). This experiment was undertaken to determine the short-term in vivo stability of endothellum on these fibronectin coated surfaces. Eight mongrel dogs underwent bilateral carotid artery replacement with both graft materlals. All grafts were inoculated with 2,000 cells/mm2 using cultured autogenous venous endothelium labelled with Indium-111-oxine. The Indium-111 label in the grafts was measured immediately prior to implantation, after 1 hour of in vivo perfusion, and at explantation after 24 hours. The percentage of inoculated cells attached to the grafts before perfusion was simillar for both materials, 93.3±3.0% versus 92.2±7.2%, for PE and e-PTFE respectively. All grafts were patent at one hour after implantation. PE grafts were found to have 93.8±3.9 % of the attached cells present at one hour while e-PTFE grafts had only 54.5 ± 10.8 % remaining, p<.001. After 24 hours, 5/8 (62.5%) e-PTFE grafts and 2/8 (25.0 %) PE grafts remained patent, p=.13. Of the patent grafts however, endothelial cell retention was still superior on the PE grafts with 78.0±0.6% of the attached cells remaining compared to only 24.5±6.1% on e-PTFE, p<.001. Occluded PE grafts had fewer cells remaining at 24 hours than patent ones, 78.0±0.6% versus 31.1±32.8%, respectively, p=.13. Histologically, patent PE grafts demonstrated nearly confluent endothelial monolayers while e-PTFE had patches of endothelial cells surrounded by, a platelet-fibrin carpet. We conclude that short-term patency appears to be determined by the extent of endothelial retention on PE but not e-PTFE.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)60-65
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Vascular Surgery
Volume1
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1986

Fingerprint

Elastomers
Polyesters
Polytetrafluoroethylene
Transplants
Endothelial Cells
Fibronectins
Perfusion
Indium
Fibrin
Carotid Arteries

Keywords

  • Arterial grafts
  • Endothelial cells
  • Polytetrafluoroethylene

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Short-term in vivo stability of endothelial-lined polyester elastomer and polytetrafluoroethylene grafts. / Kesler, Kenneth; Herring, Malcolm B.; Arnold, Michael P.; Park, Howard M.; Baughman, Sally; Glover, John L.

In: Annals of Vascular Surgery, Vol. 1, No. 1, 1986, p. 60-65.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kesler, Kenneth ; Herring, Malcolm B. ; Arnold, Michael P. ; Park, Howard M. ; Baughman, Sally ; Glover, John L. / Short-term in vivo stability of endothelial-lined polyester elastomer and polytetrafluoroethylene grafts. In: Annals of Vascular Surgery. 1986 ; Vol. 1, No. 1. pp. 60-65.
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abstract = "A fibronectin substrate will significantly enhance the strength of endothelial cell attachment on grafts constructed of polyester elastomer (PE) and polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE). This experiment was undertaken to determine the short-term in vivo stability of endothellum on these fibronectin coated surfaces. Eight mongrel dogs underwent bilateral carotid artery replacement with both graft materlals. All grafts were inoculated with 2,000 cells/mm2 using cultured autogenous venous endothelium labelled with Indium-111-oxine. The Indium-111 label in the grafts was measured immediately prior to implantation, after 1 hour of in vivo perfusion, and at explantation after 24 hours. The percentage of inoculated cells attached to the grafts before perfusion was simillar for both materials, 93.3±3.0{\%} versus 92.2±7.2{\%}, for PE and e-PTFE respectively. All grafts were patent at one hour after implantation. PE grafts were found to have 93.8±3.9 {\%} of the attached cells present at one hour while e-PTFE grafts had only 54.5 ± 10.8 {\%} remaining, p<.001. After 24 hours, 5/8 (62.5{\%}) e-PTFE grafts and 2/8 (25.0 {\%}) PE grafts remained patent, p=.13. Of the patent grafts however, endothelial cell retention was still superior on the PE grafts with 78.0±0.6{\%} of the attached cells remaining compared to only 24.5±6.1{\%} on e-PTFE, p<.001. Occluded PE grafts had fewer cells remaining at 24 hours than patent ones, 78.0±0.6{\%} versus 31.1±32.8{\%}, respectively, p=.13. Histologically, patent PE grafts demonstrated nearly confluent endothelial monolayers while e-PTFE had patches of endothelial cells surrounded by, a platelet-fibrin carpet. We conclude that short-term patency appears to be determined by the extent of endothelial retention on PE but not e-PTFE.",
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AB - A fibronectin substrate will significantly enhance the strength of endothelial cell attachment on grafts constructed of polyester elastomer (PE) and polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE). This experiment was undertaken to determine the short-term in vivo stability of endothellum on these fibronectin coated surfaces. Eight mongrel dogs underwent bilateral carotid artery replacement with both graft materlals. All grafts were inoculated with 2,000 cells/mm2 using cultured autogenous venous endothelium labelled with Indium-111-oxine. The Indium-111 label in the grafts was measured immediately prior to implantation, after 1 hour of in vivo perfusion, and at explantation after 24 hours. The percentage of inoculated cells attached to the grafts before perfusion was simillar for both materials, 93.3±3.0% versus 92.2±7.2%, for PE and e-PTFE respectively. All grafts were patent at one hour after implantation. PE grafts were found to have 93.8±3.9 % of the attached cells present at one hour while e-PTFE grafts had only 54.5 ± 10.8 % remaining, p<.001. After 24 hours, 5/8 (62.5%) e-PTFE grafts and 2/8 (25.0 %) PE grafts remained patent, p=.13. Of the patent grafts however, endothelial cell retention was still superior on the PE grafts with 78.0±0.6% of the attached cells remaining compared to only 24.5±6.1% on e-PTFE, p<.001. Occluded PE grafts had fewer cells remaining at 24 hours than patent ones, 78.0±0.6% versus 31.1±32.8%, respectively, p=.13. Histologically, patent PE grafts demonstrated nearly confluent endothelial monolayers while e-PTFE had patches of endothelial cells surrounded by, a platelet-fibrin carpet. We conclude that short-term patency appears to be determined by the extent of endothelial retention on PE but not e-PTFE.

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