Skeletal and dental effects of rapid maxillary expansion assessed through three-dimensional imaging: A multicenter study

Joshua Luebbert, Ahmed Ghoneima, Manuel O. Lagravère

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to determine the skeletal and dental changes in rapid maxillary expansion treatments in two different populations assessed through cone-beam computer tomography (CBCT).

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-one patients from Edmonton, Canada and 16 patients from Cairo, Egypt with maxillary transverse deficiency (11-17 years old) were treated with a tooth-borne maxillary expander (Hyrax). CBCTs were obtained from each patient at two time points (initial T1 and at removal of appliance at 3-6 months T2). CBCTs were analyzed using AVIZO software and landmarks were placed on skeletal and dental anatomical structures on the cranial base, maxilla and mandible. Descriptive statistics, intraclass correlation coefficients and one-way ANOVA analysis were used to determine if there were skeletal and dental changes and if these changes were statistically different between both populations.

RESULTS: Descriptive statistics show that dental changes were larger than skeletal changes for both populations. Skeletal and dental changes between populations were not statistically different (P<0.05) from each other with the exception of the upper incisor proclination being larger in the Indiana group (P>0.05).

CONCLUSION: Rapid maxillary expansion treatments in different populations demonstrate similar skeletal and dental changes. These changes are greater on the dental structures compared to the skeletal ones in a 4:1 ratio.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)15-31
Number of pages17
JournalInternational orthodontics
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

Keywords

  • Cone-beam computer tomography
  • Rapid maxillary expansion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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