Sleep in children with type 1 diabetes and their parents in the T1D Exchange

for the

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objectives Sleep has physiological and behavioral impacts on diabetes outcomes, yet little is known about the impact of sleep disturbances in children with type 1 diabetes. The current study sought to characterize sleep in children with type 1 diabetes and in their parents and to examine the associations between child sleep, glycemic control and adherence, parent sleep and well-being, parental fear of hypoglycemia, and nocturnal caregiving behavior. Methods Surveys were emailed to parents of 2- to 12-year-old participants in the Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) Exchange clinic registry. Clinical data were obtained from the registry for the 515 respondents. Results In our sample, 67% of children met criteria for poor sleep quality. Child sleep quality was related to glycemic control (HbA1c of 7.9% [63 mmol/mol] in children with poor sleep quality vs 7.6% [60 mmol/mol] in children with non-poor sleep quality; P < 0.001) but not mean frequency of blood glucose monitoring (BGM) (7.6 times/day vs 7.4 in poor/non-poor quality; P = 0.56). Associations were similar for sleep duration. Children with poor sleep quality were more likely to experience severe hypoglycemia (4% in children with poor sleep quality vs 1% in children with non-poor sleep quality; P = 0.05) and more likely to experience DKA (7% vs 4%, respectively; P < 0.001). Poorer child sleep quality was associated with poorer parental sleep quality, parental well-being, and fear of hypoglycemia (P < 0.001 for all). Child sleep was not related to the use of diabetes-related technology (CGM, insulin pump). Conclusions Sleep may be a modifiable factor to improve glycemic control and reduce parental distress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)108-115
Number of pages8
JournalSleep Medicine
Volume39
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2017

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Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Sleep
Parents
Hypoglycemia
Fear
Registries
Blood Glucose

Keywords

  • Glycemic control
  • Sleep quality
  • Type 1 diabetes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Sleep in children with type 1 diabetes and their parents in the T1D Exchange. / for the.

In: Sleep Medicine, Vol. 39, 01.11.2017, p. 108-115.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Sleep in children with type 1 diabetes and their parents in the T1D Exchange",
abstract = "Objectives Sleep has physiological and behavioral impacts on diabetes outcomes, yet little is known about the impact of sleep disturbances in children with type 1 diabetes. The current study sought to characterize sleep in children with type 1 diabetes and in their parents and to examine the associations between child sleep, glycemic control and adherence, parent sleep and well-being, parental fear of hypoglycemia, and nocturnal caregiving behavior. Methods Surveys were emailed to parents of 2- to 12-year-old participants in the Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) Exchange clinic registry. Clinical data were obtained from the registry for the 515 respondents. Results In our sample, 67{\%} of children met criteria for poor sleep quality. Child sleep quality was related to glycemic control (HbA1c of 7.9{\%} [63 mmol/mol] in children with poor sleep quality vs 7.6{\%} [60 mmol/mol] in children with non-poor sleep quality; P < 0.001) but not mean frequency of blood glucose monitoring (BGM) (7.6 times/day vs 7.4 in poor/non-poor quality; P = 0.56). Associations were similar for sleep duration. Children with poor sleep quality were more likely to experience severe hypoglycemia (4{\%} in children with poor sleep quality vs 1{\%} in children with non-poor sleep quality; P = 0.05) and more likely to experience DKA (7{\%} vs 4{\%}, respectively; P < 0.001). Poorer child sleep quality was associated with poorer parental sleep quality, parental well-being, and fear of hypoglycemia (P < 0.001 for all). Child sleep was not related to the use of diabetes-related technology (CGM, insulin pump). Conclusions Sleep may be a modifiable factor to improve glycemic control and reduce parental distress.",
keywords = "Glycemic control, Sleep quality, Type 1 diabetes",
author = "{for the} and Jaser, {Sarah S.} and Foster, {Nicole C.} and Nelson, {Bryce A.} and Kittelsrud, {Julie M.} and Linda DiMeglio and Maryanne Quinn and Willi, {Steven M.} and Simmons, {Jill H.}",
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T1 - Sleep in children with type 1 diabetes and their parents in the T1D Exchange

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AU - Jaser, Sarah S.

AU - Foster, Nicole C.

AU - Nelson, Bryce A.

AU - Kittelsrud, Julie M.

AU - DiMeglio, Linda

AU - Quinn, Maryanne

AU - Willi, Steven M.

AU - Simmons, Jill H.

PY - 2017/11/1

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N2 - Objectives Sleep has physiological and behavioral impacts on diabetes outcomes, yet little is known about the impact of sleep disturbances in children with type 1 diabetes. The current study sought to characterize sleep in children with type 1 diabetes and in their parents and to examine the associations between child sleep, glycemic control and adherence, parent sleep and well-being, parental fear of hypoglycemia, and nocturnal caregiving behavior. Methods Surveys were emailed to parents of 2- to 12-year-old participants in the Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) Exchange clinic registry. Clinical data were obtained from the registry for the 515 respondents. Results In our sample, 67% of children met criteria for poor sleep quality. Child sleep quality was related to glycemic control (HbA1c of 7.9% [63 mmol/mol] in children with poor sleep quality vs 7.6% [60 mmol/mol] in children with non-poor sleep quality; P < 0.001) but not mean frequency of blood glucose monitoring (BGM) (7.6 times/day vs 7.4 in poor/non-poor quality; P = 0.56). Associations were similar for sleep duration. Children with poor sleep quality were more likely to experience severe hypoglycemia (4% in children with poor sleep quality vs 1% in children with non-poor sleep quality; P = 0.05) and more likely to experience DKA (7% vs 4%, respectively; P < 0.001). Poorer child sleep quality was associated with poorer parental sleep quality, parental well-being, and fear of hypoglycemia (P < 0.001 for all). Child sleep was not related to the use of diabetes-related technology (CGM, insulin pump). Conclusions Sleep may be a modifiable factor to improve glycemic control and reduce parental distress.

AB - Objectives Sleep has physiological and behavioral impacts on diabetes outcomes, yet little is known about the impact of sleep disturbances in children with type 1 diabetes. The current study sought to characterize sleep in children with type 1 diabetes and in their parents and to examine the associations between child sleep, glycemic control and adherence, parent sleep and well-being, parental fear of hypoglycemia, and nocturnal caregiving behavior. Methods Surveys were emailed to parents of 2- to 12-year-old participants in the Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) Exchange clinic registry. Clinical data were obtained from the registry for the 515 respondents. Results In our sample, 67% of children met criteria for poor sleep quality. Child sleep quality was related to glycemic control (HbA1c of 7.9% [63 mmol/mol] in children with poor sleep quality vs 7.6% [60 mmol/mol] in children with non-poor sleep quality; P < 0.001) but not mean frequency of blood glucose monitoring (BGM) (7.6 times/day vs 7.4 in poor/non-poor quality; P = 0.56). Associations were similar for sleep duration. Children with poor sleep quality were more likely to experience severe hypoglycemia (4% in children with poor sleep quality vs 1% in children with non-poor sleep quality; P = 0.05) and more likely to experience DKA (7% vs 4%, respectively; P < 0.001). Poorer child sleep quality was associated with poorer parental sleep quality, parental well-being, and fear of hypoglycemia (P < 0.001 for all). Child sleep was not related to the use of diabetes-related technology (CGM, insulin pump). Conclusions Sleep may be a modifiable factor to improve glycemic control and reduce parental distress.

KW - Glycemic control

KW - Sleep quality

KW - Type 1 diabetes

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